HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

AOML Keynotes for November/December 2020: The 2020 hurricane field program, cloud ice in hurricanes, hurricane gliders, and more…

Another story details the Saildrone, an autonomous vehicle that sails on the ocean surface collecting upper-ocean and near-surface weather data, that will be tested in hurricane conditions. Check out the most recent issue of AOML Keynotes here.

Paper about how a new forecast model for hurricanes performed during 2019 published in Weather and Forecasting

This paper summarizes forecasts from an experimental forecast model called the Hurricane Analysis and Forecast System (HAFS) made during the 2019 Hurricane Season. HAFS is being developed for future use as an operational hurricane model to help forecasters predict what a hurricane is going to do. HAFS forecasts the weather on a set of points … Continue reading Paper about how a new forecast model for hurricanes performed during 2019 published in Weather and Forecasting

HRD scientists participate in the 101st American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting

The Annual Meeting is the world’s largest yearly gathering for the weather, water, and climate community. It brings together great minds from a diverse set of scientific disciplines – helping attendees make career-long professional contact and life-long friends while learning from the very top people in the atmospheric sciences. The 101st AMS Annual Meeting took place virtually … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 101st American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting

HRD Scientists participate in 2020 Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project Annual Meeting

The 2020 HFIP Annual Meeting was held virtually from 17-19 November. The primary objective of the meeting was to discuss the key HFIP strategies as documented in the HFIP Strategic plan, including development of the next-generation Hurricane Analysis and Forecast System (HAFS) within NOAA's Unified Forecast System. The current state of operational hurricane modeling capabilities … Continue reading HRD Scientists participate in 2020 Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project Annual Meeting

HRD scientists participate in workshop on NOAA’s new forecast model

Scientists from the Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Hurricane Research Division are participating in the first Unified Forecast System (UFS) Users Workshop held virtually July 27-29, 2020. UFS is a new Earth modeling system that is under active development to become NOAA's main operational numerical weather prediction model.  It is a single model that will make forecasts in local regions … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in workshop on NOAA’s new forecast model

Paper on ice particles in tropical cyclones and how they are represented in forecast models published in Geophysical Research Letters

Summary:  In order to accurately forecast the weather, models must accurately represent how liquid water and ice particles in cloud form, grow, and disappear, how big and how many of each there are. To do that, we must know how this all works in real clouds.  The NOAA P3 Hurricane Hunter Aircraft have instruments called … Continue reading Paper on ice particles in tropical cyclones and how they are represented in forecast models published in Geophysical Research Letters

Paper on how Hurricane Michael (2018) intensified rapidly in the Gulf of Mexico published in Monthly Weather Review

Weather forecasters use computer models to make predictions. These forecasts of the future depend on knowing what is happening now, what we call initial conditions. However, we can't measure the weather at every location on earth all the time, so we don't know exactly what these initial conditions are. Therefore, we run forecast models many … Continue reading Paper on how Hurricane Michael (2018) intensified rapidly in the Gulf of Mexico published in Monthly Weather Review