HRD Debrief for missions into 2019 Sheared Storms – 18 February 2020

HRD researchers discussed the results from the 14 P-3 and 8 G-IV missions into sheared Hurricanes Barry, AL02 (10–12 July 2019), Humberto, AL09 (13–16 September 2019 ), Jerry, AL10 (18–22 September 2019), and Lorenzo, AL13 (26 – 29 September 2019). The format of the debrief was different than in the past. A brief overview is … Continue reading HRD Debrief for missions into 2019 Sheared Storms – 18 February 2020

HRD Debrief for missions into Hurricane Dorian – 30 January 2020

HRD researchers discussed the results from the 15 P-3 and 10 G-IV missions into Hurricane Dorian, AL05 (26 August - 5 September 2019). The format of the debrief was different than in the past. A brief overview is provided of the storm and missions, followed by a series of 8 short presentations discussing planned and … Continue reading HRD Debrief for missions into Hurricane Dorian – 30 January 2020

Paper on daily changes in hurricanes published in Geophysical Research Letters

Summary: The very tall clouds that we see in satellite pictures of tropical cyclones (also known as hurricanes) fan out from the hurricane's center over the course of each day, what we call a diurnal cycle. This is because a pulse of thunderstorms and rain forms near the hurricane center each night and steadily moves … Continue reading Paper on daily changes in hurricanes published in Geophysical Research Letters

HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

HRD scientists recently attended the 100th American Meteorological Society Meeting in Boston. There, they presented 33 oral presentations and 10 posters. Left to right: Mu-Chich Ko, Andrew Kren, Joe Cione, Karina Apodaca, Michael Mueller, Sarah Ditchek, Steve Diaz, Jonathan Zawislak, Andy Hazelton, Lisa Bucci, Frank Marks, Shirley Murillo, Xuejin Zhang, John Cortinas, Eric Uhlhorn, and … Continue reading HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

Paper on differences in rainfall between tropical disturbances that form into tropical cyclones and those that don’t published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: Many weather satellites are outfitted with instruments that can see through clouds to sense where and how hard it is raining (the rain rate), and how much of the rain is occurring in deep convective clouds (cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds that form when warm air rises). They can also see tropical disturbances, which are usually … Continue reading Paper on differences in rainfall between tropical disturbances that form into tropical cyclones and those that don’t published in Monthly Weather Review

AOML Flies Science Missions into Succession of Atlantic Storms

“Many of the storms we flew in 2019 were ‘living on the edge,’ in that they were weak, vertically sheared, but also unpredictable. In previous years, we saw these storms intensify, such as Hurricane Michael in 2018. This season, many struggled to intensify. As we continue to build a dataset of these sheared storms, we … Continue reading AOML Flies Science Missions into Succession of Atlantic Storms

Scientists show the potential impact of the new and proposed COSMIC-2 satellites on weather forecasts in a paper published in Weather and Forecasting

Summary:   The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) are satellites launched in 2006 to orbit the earth about 500 miles above ground. They use radio signals from Global Positioning System satellites in a process called “radio occultation” to measure temperature and moisture with high accuracy and resolution. These data have proven … Continue reading Scientists show the potential impact of the new and proposed COSMIC-2 satellites on weather forecasts in a paper published in Weather and Forecasting