Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons released online in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

For more information, contact aoml.communications@noaa.gov. The article is available at https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0223.1. The authors thank the US NCEP, JTWC, NRL, the Remote Sensing Systems, NOAA NESDIS, the European Union’s Copernicus and the AVISO team, and theArgo team for providing essential data sets. I.-I. L. acknowledges support from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan. R. R. … Continue reading Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons released online in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Paper on the likely impact of new satellites on forecasts published in Monthly Weather Review

The Time-Resolved Observations of Precipitation structure and storm Intensity with a Constellation of Smallsats (TROPICS) mission is a group of satellites that will provide observations of temperature, moisture, rainfall, and water particles in the atmosphere.  Planned for launch in 2022, the satellites will provide measurements that will be particularly important for studying tropical cyclones because … Continue reading Paper on the likely impact of new satellites on forecasts published in Monthly Weather Review

Jason Dunion, Frank Marks, and Rob Rogers participate in the WMO-sponsored Tropical Cyclone-Probabilistic Forecast Products Workshop

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) hosted a three-day virtual workshop on June 15, 17, and 18 to chart a path forward for evaluating, developing, and improving tropical cyclone probabilistic forecast products (TC-PFP). Co-led by Jason Dunion (NOAA/AOML/HRD and UM/CIMAS), Munehiko Yamaguchi (Japanese Meteorological Agency), and Hui Yu (Shanghai Typhoon Institute) as part of the WMO Working … Continue reading Jason Dunion, Frank Marks, and Rob Rogers participate in the WMO-sponsored Tropical Cyclone-Probabilistic Forecast Products Workshop

HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

Paper that reviews what we know about intensity change published in Atmosphere

This paper is an overview of what we currently know about processes important in tropical cyclone intensity change and the research that has been done during the past 15 years using aircraft data. The paper describes the eye and eyewall and how they change in time, the region close to the ocean surface where the … Continue reading Paper that reviews what we know about intensity change published in Atmosphere

Rob Rogers presents seminar at the University of Maryland

Rob Rogers presented a seminar on the history and future of NOAA's Hurricane Field Program at the University of Maryland College Park Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Science. You can download the slides at ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/pub/hrd/blog/seminars/2021/UMd-Seminar_Rogers2021.pptx, or listen to a recording of the seminar at https://umd.hosted.panopto.com/Panopto/Pages/Viewer.aspx?id=657380bf-6519-4bcc-890e-ad19015f4b7b.

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of April 2021

April's science meeting consisted of four presentations: Xiaomin Chen: "Boundary Layer Recovery and Precipitation Symmetrization Preceding Rapid Intensification of Tropical Cyclones under Shear" Andy Hazelton: "HAFS Ensemble of Hurricane Dorian (2019): Early Intensity and Long-Term Track" Jon Zawislak: "Accomplishments of NOAA's Airborne Hurricane Field Program and a Broader Future Approach to Forecast Improvement" Kathryn Sellwood: … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of April 2021

AOML holds virtual open house

AOML recently hosted a series of webinars about what AOML does and how it contributes to scientific advancement across the globe. You can catch Jon Zawislak, Rob Rogers, Joe Cione, and Shirley Murillo talking about hurricanes, or listen in on recordings of panels on coasts and coral reefs, and ocean research, and even a panel … Continue reading AOML holds virtual open house

Paper describing how tropical cyclones in shear rapidly develop published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Tropical Cyclones (TCs) occur over warm water in the ocean, and this warmth and moisture is what feeds the engine that keeps the TC going.  They are made up of thunderstorms, what we call deep convection, and within the convection, there are both convective updrafts and convective downdrafts.  The temperature in the atmosphere goes down … Continue reading Paper describing how tropical cyclones in shear rapidly develop published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences