HRD Monthly Science Meeting of May 2019

May’s science meeting consisted of seven presentations: Kelly Ryan: Projects featuring collaboration and consultation on OSEs, OSSEs, data visualization, and machine learning William Ramstrom: Nest Development for FV3 Michael Fischer: Potential mechanisms for two secondary eyewall formation events in Hurricane Irma (2017) Kelly Nunez (PSU): PV budget analysis of high resolution simulations to understand the … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of May 2019

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of April 2019

April’s science meeting consisted of four presentations: Sim Aberson - A Preliminary Look at High-resolution HEDAS analyses of Pre-Sergio (2018) Xuejin Zhang - Development of Moving Nest in FV3GFS Ghassan Alaka - HWRF Verification: Overall Progress & 2018 Highlights Lisa Bucci - Exploring TC Predictability in an OSSE framework Three of the four presentations are … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of April 2019

Paper on getting the best TC forecasts using NOAA’s G-IV released online in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: During each hurricane season, NOAA’s Gulfstream-IV (G-IV) Hurricane Hunter aircraft measures wind, temperature, humidity, and pressure in and around hurricanes threatening the United States.  An instrument called the dropwindsonde is released from the G-IV to collect the data as it falls to the ocean surface.  The plane currently flies where we expect observations from the … Continue reading Paper on getting the best TC forecasts using NOAA’s G-IV released online in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on the tropical cyclone diurnal cycle as seen in a forecast model published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: As tropical cyclones (TCs) move across the oceans, they begin to expand each day around sunset, with clouds reaching hundreds of miles from the center by the following afternoon. This daily “exhale” of the clouds is a feature of what we call the TC diurnal cycle. This study looks at the this cycle in … Continue reading Paper on the tropical cyclone diurnal cycle as seen in a forecast model published in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on possible improvements to forecasts from additional radio-occultation satellite data published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) are a set of satellites that were launched in 2006 and orbit the earth about 500 miles above ground. They use radio signals from Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites in a process called “radio occultation” to measure temperature and moisture with high accuracy every 100 … Continue reading Paper on possible improvements to forecasts from additional radio-occultation satellite data published in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on the impact of new satellite wind velocity data on hurricane forecasts published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: The CYclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) was launched into space on December 15, 2016, to improve hurricane (tropical cyclone) forecasts by measuring wind speed on the ocean surface. Since the tropical cyclones mostly occur over oceans where other wind data are usually not available, the new observations can measure their wind speeds. This … Continue reading Paper on the impact of new satellite wind velocity data on hurricane forecasts published in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on calculating and using wind speed and direction from the new NASA CYclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) published in the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology

Summary:  The NASA CYclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) measures wind speed, but not direction, at the ocean surface. To test the impact of new observations before such a satellite system is launched, observations like those from the satellite are created from a weather model. This study uses these “simulated” observations to learn how to … Continue reading Paper on calculating and using wind speed and direction from the new NASA CYclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) published in the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology