HRD scientists participate in the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2021

The American Geophysical Union is holding their annual Fall Meeting 13-17 December in New Orleans, and also online. Every year, the Fall Meeting unites >25,000 attendees from 100+ countries in the Earth and space sciences community to discuss findings, connect scientists from around the world, advance the profession and connect over passion for the impact … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2021

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of July 2021

July's science meeting consisted of five presentations: Sophie Grimsley (Lapenta Intern): "Project Check-in: Hurricane Intensity Change and Boundary Layer Processes" Nick Mesa (Lapenta Intern): "Investigating Intensity Changes Related to Thermodynamic Processes Using Near-coincident Aircraft and Satellite Observations" Laura Ko: "A Consensus Machine Learning Model for Hurricane RI Probabilistic Predictions" Sim Aberson: "Including High-Resolution AMVs in … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of July 2021

Mu-Chieh Ko presents an Introduction to Machine Learning for Environmental Science

Machine Learning (ML) has become one of the most innovative methods to solve problems related to "big data." in In environmental science, ML can be used as a prediction model, parameterization method, or model enhancement tool. This introduction included fundamentals of ML algorithms, including k-Nearest Neighbors, Random Forest, and Artificial Neural Networks, and their applications … Continue reading Mu-Chieh Ko presents an Introduction to Machine Learning for Environmental Science

Frank Marks presents seminar on a new model to predict rainfall in tropical cyclones to NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center

Abstract: Heavy precipitation is a major hazard in landfalling tropical cyclones (TCs). Historically, heavy rainfall has caused freshwater floods and mudslides during TC landfalls, accounting for 27% of deaths, and devastating property. Hence, improving current TC rainfall forecasts is indispensable. A new TC rainfall model is described that provides five-day probabilistic forecasts of extreme rainfall … Continue reading Frank Marks presents seminar on a new model to predict rainfall in tropical cyclones to NOAA’s Weather Prediction Center

HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

AOML Keynotes for November/December 2020: The 2020 hurricane field program, cloud ice in hurricanes, hurricane gliders, and more…

Another story details the Saildrone, an autonomous vehicle that sails on the ocean surface collecting upper-ocean and near-surface weather data, that will be tested in hurricane conditions. Check out the most recent issue of AOML Keynotes here.

NOAA Hurricane Model Performance is Evaluated for the First Time in Predicting Rainfall from 2017 Hurricane Harvey

On Posted onJuly 1, 2020 by AOML Communications to Hurricane Research A recent study published in the journal Atmosphere evaluated for the first time, how well NOAA’s regional hurricane model was able to forecast the location and amount of devastating rainfall in 2017’s Hurricane Harvey. The Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model predicted the realistic total rainfall and the location of … Continue reading NOAA Hurricane Model Performance is Evaluated for the First Time in Predicting Rainfall from 2017 Hurricane Harvey

Paper on the ability of forecast models to predict the extreme rainfall from Hurricane Harvey (2017) released Atmosphere

Hurricane Harvey brought up to 5 feet of rainfall to Texas and Louisiana in just a few days in 2017. The strongest rainfall typically happens near the center (eye) of a hurricane. Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall was unusually located far away from the eye. These unusual events make it difficult for forecast models to correctly predict … Continue reading Paper on the ability of forecast models to predict the extreme rainfall from Hurricane Harvey (2017) released Atmosphere

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of May 2020

May's science meeting consisted of six presentations: Michael Fischer: An examination of local shear, vortex tilt, and tropical cyclone intensity change using airborne radar observations Erica Bower: Towards an Automated Approach to Analyzing Extreme Precipitation and Tropical Cyclones Hua Leighton: Ice Particle Size Distributions from Composites of Microphysics Observations Collected in Tropical Cyclones Laura Ko: … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of May 2020