Paper that reviews what we know about intensity change published in Atmosphere

This paper is an overview of what we currently know about processes important in tropical cyclone intensity change and the research that has been done during the past 15 years using aircraft data. The paper describes the eye and eyewall and how they change in time, the region close to the ocean surface where the … Continue reading Paper that reviews what we know about intensity change published in Atmosphere

AOML Keynotes for November/December 2020: The 2020 hurricane field program, cloud ice in hurricanes, hurricane gliders, and more…

Another story details the Saildrone, an autonomous vehicle that sails on the ocean surface collecting upper-ocean and near-surface weather data, that will be tested in hurricane conditions. Check out the most recent issue of AOML Keynotes here.

HRD scientists participate in the 101st American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting

The Annual Meeting is the world’s largest yearly gathering for the weather, water, and climate community. It brings together great minds from a diverse set of scientific disciplines – helping attendees make career-long professional contact and life-long friends while learning from the very top people in the atmospheric sciences. The 101st AMS Annual Meeting took place virtually … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 101st American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting

Paper on forecasting how raindrops, snowflakes, and ice form, grow, and fall published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary:  Tropical cyclones (TCs) are made up of clouds and thunderstorms, and thus drop large amounts of rain. The clouds are made up of cloud particles such as raindrops, snowflakes, and ice.  Knowledge of the ways these particles form, grow, and fall (what we call cloud microphysics) is very important for accurate TC rainfall forecasts, … Continue reading Paper on forecasting how raindrops, snowflakes, and ice form, grow, and fall published in Monthly Weather Review

AOML scientists assess Major Hurricane Delta’s rapid intensification

NOAA aircraft reconnaissance continued for Major Hurricane Delta on October 6, capturing the system's quick maturation overnight. P-3 and G-IV missions are scheduled every 12 hours from Lakeland, FL. The National Hurricane Center (NHC) tasked NOAA's Hurricane Hunters to identify the location and strength of the circulation center, and to survey the atmospheric conditions nearby … Continue reading AOML scientists assess Major Hurricane Delta’s rapid intensification

Major Hurricane Teddy missions provide unique dataset for AOML hurricane scientists

NOAA's Hurricane Hunters continue reconnaissance for major Hurricane Teddy, conducting numerous science experiments developed by AOML and its collaborators.  The two P-3 aircraft will take off from St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands at 10 AM and 6 PM EDT, respectively, on September 18 as tasked by AOML's Hurricane Research Division. AOML hurricane scientists will guide and … Continue reading Major Hurricane Teddy missions provide unique dataset for AOML hurricane scientists

NOAA Hurricane Hunters conduct missions investigating Hurricane Teddy

AOML's Hurricane Research Division tasked the NOAA Hurricane Hunters to explore the atmospheric conditions associated with Teddy's development. AOML scientists providing support for P-3 and G-IV flights into Teddy plan to manage multiple objectives laid out in their Intensity Forecasting Experiment (IFEX).  Flight track planned for the NOAA P-3 mission into Hurricane Teddy. G-IV reconnaissance will continue on … Continue reading NOAA Hurricane Hunters conduct missions investigating Hurricane Teddy

Learn about the Hurricane Field Program with Kelly Ryan

During the typical Atlantic hurricane season from June 1 to November 30, NOAA aircraft collect crucial observations to improve the understanding and prediction of these massive cyclonic storms. Scientists at NOAA’s Hurricane Research Division in Miami Florida, fly into the heart of powerful storms to try and answer hypotheses prevalent in hurricane research, and support … Continue reading Learn about the Hurricane Field Program with Kelly Ryan

2020 version of HWRF goes into operations

The 2020 version of the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model went into operations at 1200 UTC on August 5, 2020. This highlights another excellent collaboration between NOAA's Environmental Modeling Center, HRD, and the Developmental Testbed Center to upgrade the model with the goal of delivering the best possible hurricane guidance to forecasters. The … Continue reading 2020 version of HWRF goes into operations