Study on how to improve model forecasts of the region closest to the ocean surface released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary:  Turbulence is made up of random and continuously changing wind.  It is important in tropical cyclones (TCs) because turbulence in the lowest 1-2 km of the free atmosphere (the planetary boundary layer or PBL) affects TC intensity and structural change. Meteorologists use computer models to forecast the weather, including TCs. These models forecast the … Continue reading Study on how to improve model forecasts of the region closest to the ocean surface released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of April 2021

April's science meeting consisted of four presentations: Xiaomin Chen: "Boundary Layer Recovery and Precipitation Symmetrization Preceding Rapid Intensification of Tropical Cyclones under Shear" Andy Hazelton: "HAFS Ensemble of Hurricane Dorian (2019): Early Intensity and Long-Term Track" Jon Zawislak: "Accomplishments of NOAA's Airborne Hurricane Field Program and a Broader Future Approach to Forecast Improvement" Kathryn Sellwood: … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of April 2021

HRD scientists participate in annual AVAPS Users Group Meeting

The annual meeting, held online this year, brings together developers and users of the Airborne Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System, the basis of the dropwindsondes released in and around tropical cyclones each summer since 1997. The AVAPS dropsondes are released from NOAA and Air Force aircraft to measure high-resolution profiles of temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in annual AVAPS Users Group Meeting

AOML holds virtual open house

AOML recently hosted a series of webinars about what AOML does and how it contributes to scientific advancement across the globe. You can catch Jon Zawislak, Rob Rogers, Joe Cione, and Shirley Murillo talking about hurricanes, or listen in on recordings of panels on coasts and coral reefs, and ocean research, and even a panel … Continue reading AOML holds virtual open house

Healther Holbach participates in SHORELINE21 Workshop

Dr. Heather Holbach participated in the SHared Operation REsearch Logistics In the Nearshore Environment (SHORELINE21) Workshop on April 26-27, 2021.  This workshop brought together experts from the fields of wind/coastal engineering, atmospheric science, oceanography, ecology, emergency management, and crisis communications to discuss field and laboratory research related to landfalling hurricanes, with a focus on reducing … Continue reading Healther Holbach participates in SHORELINE21 Workshop

Paper describing how tropical cyclones in shear rapidly develop published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Tropical Cyclones (TCs) occur over warm water in the ocean, and this warmth and moisture is what feeds the engine that keeps the TC going.  They are made up of thunderstorms, what we call deep convection, and within the convection, there are both convective updrafts and convective downdrafts.  The temperature in the atmosphere goes down … Continue reading Paper describing how tropical cyclones in shear rapidly develop published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

AOML Keynotes for November/December 2020: The 2020 hurricane field program, cloud ice in hurricanes, hurricane gliders, and more…

Another story details the Saildrone, an autonomous vehicle that sails on the ocean surface collecting upper-ocean and near-surface weather data, that will be tested in hurricane conditions. Check out the most recent issue of AOML Keynotes here.

HRD scientists participate in the 101st American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting

The Annual Meeting is the world’s largest yearly gathering for the weather, water, and climate community. It brings together great minds from a diverse set of scientific disciplines – helping attendees make career-long professional contact and life-long friends while learning from the very top people in the atmospheric sciences. The 101st AMS Annual Meeting took place virtually … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 101st American Meteorological Society Annual Meeting