Paper on assimilating Doppler wind lidar and Doppler radar data into a hurricane model published in Remote Sensing

This study examines the impact of assimilating Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) data on hurricane prediction in the operational Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting system. A series of experiments were conducted to identify the best way to assimilate the DWL data in comparison to assimilation of Tail Doppler radar data. A new data thinning method was … Continue reading Paper on assimilating Doppler wind lidar and Doppler radar data into a hurricane model published in Remote Sensing

Gus Alaka highlighted in the May 2022 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

You can find more information at https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/2021/11/08/paper-describing-a-new-forecast-model-that-follows-multiple-tropical-cyclones-at-the-same-time-released-online-in-the-bulletin-of-the-american-meteorological-society/or by contacting aoml.communications@noaa.gov.

Paper describing a new forecast model that follows multiple tropical cyclones at the same time highlighted on the cover of the latest Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Forecast models that follow individual tropical cyclones (TCs), like NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model, have contributed to significant improvement of intensity forecasts for over a decade.  The original HWRF could only follow one TC, but recent advances allow individual multiple nests to follow more than one TC.  This is the first time that the … Continue reading Paper describing a new forecast model that follows multiple tropical cyclones at the same time highlighted on the cover of the latest Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

New hurricane research supports advances to NOAA’s 2022 forecasts

This summer during the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season, scientists at NOAA’s Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory (AOML) will once again be on the frontlines helping NOAA prepare the public for severe weather. They will also conduct new research on the complex processes of how tropical cyclones form, develop, and dissipate. AOML’s operational missions tasked by NOAA’s Environmental … Continue reading New hurricane research supports advances to NOAA’s 2022 forecasts

HRD scientists participate in the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2021

The American Geophysical Union is holding their annual Fall Meeting 13-17 December in New Orleans, and also online. Every year, the Fall Meeting unites >25,000 attendees from 100+ countries in the Earth and space sciences community to discuss findings, connect scientists from around the world, advance the profession and connect over passion for the impact … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2021

Rob Rogers gave invited presentation at the opening ceremony for the Asia-Pacific Typhoon Collaborative Research Center (AP-TCRC) – 29 November 2021

On 29 November, 2021, Rob Rogers gave an invited virtual talk entitled "Advances in the Understanding and Prediction of Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change from Airborne Observations" at a new international joint tropical cyclone research organization, named the Asia-Pacific Typhoon Collaborative Research Center (AP-TCRC). The AP-TCRC is supported by the ESCAP/WMO Typhoon Committee (the Committee) and … Continue reading Rob Rogers gave invited presentation at the opening ceremony for the Asia-Pacific Typhoon Collaborative Research Center (AP-TCRC) – 29 November 2021

Paper describing a new forecast model that follows multiple tropical cyclones at the same time published in The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Forecast models that follow individual tropical cyclones (TCs), like NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model, have contributed to significant improvement of intensity forecasts for over a decade.  The original HWRF could only follow one TC, but recent advances allow individual multiple nests to follow more than one TC.  This is the first time … Continue reading Paper describing a new forecast model that follows multiple tropical cyclones at the same time published in The Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Study showing how tropical cyclone track and intensity varies in very short time periods in models published in Monthly Weather Review

Large fluctuations in track and intensity are found in 3⅓-second output from NOAA’s operational Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) Model. Track varied by an average of 6-8 km, and intensity by up to 20 kt (23 mph) on these short time scales. Soothing these fluctuations led to up to a 8% improvement in forecasts. For … Continue reading Study showing how tropical cyclone track and intensity varies in very short time periods in models published in Monthly Weather Review