Paper on the ability of forecast models to predict the extreme rainfall from Hurricane Harvey (2017) released Atmosphere

Hurricane Harvey brought up to 5 feet of rainfall to Texas and Louisiana in just a few days in 2017. The strongest rainfall typically happens near the center (eye) of a hurricane. Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall was unusually located far away from the eye. These unusual events make it difficult for forecast models to correctly predict … Continue reading Paper on the ability of forecast models to predict the extreme rainfall from Hurricane Harvey (2017) released Atmosphere

Busy Atlantic hurricane season predicted for 2020

Multiple climate factors indicate above-normal activity is most likely A summary infographic showing hurricane season probability and numbers of named storms predicted from NOAA's 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook. Read the news at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/busy-atlantic-hurricane-season-predicted-for-2020 or watch the video summary at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asD4wtMj73s.Hurricane preparedness is critically important for the 2020 hurricane season, just as it is every … Continue reading Busy Atlantic hurricane season predicted for 2020

HRD Seminar – Dr. Altug Aksoy (CIMAS/HRD) – 3 March 2020

Dr. Aksoy presented a seminar titled “Assimilation of Coyote UAS Observations in Hurricane Maria (2017): Optimization of Data Impact”. ABSTRACT The Coyote is a low-altitude small unmanned aircraft system (sUAS) that is air-launched from the NOAA WP-3D (P-3) hurricane hunter aircraft through its existing standard A-size sonobuoy launch capability. Its meteorological sensors directly measure temperature, … Continue reading HRD Seminar – Dr. Altug Aksoy (CIMAS/HRD) – 3 March 2020

Paper evaluating different schemes to predict convection in hurricanes released online in Weather and Forecasting

Forecasters and researchers use the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model to forecast where a hurricane will go, how strong it will be, how large it will be, and where the strongest winds are. Hurricanes are made up of thunderstorms (what we call convection), but individual thunderstorms are too small for the models we … Continue reading Paper evaluating different schemes to predict convection in hurricanes released online in Weather and Forecasting

HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

HRD scientists recently attended the 100th American Meteorological Society Meeting in Boston. There, they presented 33 oral presentations and 10 posters. Left to right: Mu-Chich Ko, Andrew Kren, Joe Cione, Karina Apodaca, Michael Mueller, Sarah Ditchek, Steve Diaz, Jonathan Zawislak, Andy Hazelton, Lisa Bucci, Frank Marks, Shirley Murillo, Xuejin Zhang, John Cortinas, Eric Uhlhorn, and … Continue reading HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

Hurricanes are fed by energy from the warm ocean. The center of a hurricane is surrounded by tall clouds, called cumulus clouds, that produce the heat needed to keep the spin, what we call vorticity, in the hurricanes going. When there are a lot of cumulus clouds around the hurricane's center, the hurricane spins more rapidly. However, … Continue reading Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

AOML Flies Science Missions into Succession of Atlantic Storms

“Many of the storms we flew in 2019 were ‘living on the edge,’ in that they were weak, vertically sheared, but also unpredictable. In previous years, we saw these storms intensify, such as Hurricane Michael in 2018. This season, many struggled to intensify. As we continue to build a dataset of these sheared storms, we … Continue reading AOML Flies Science Missions into Succession of Atlantic Storms