Heather Holbach participates in webinar about the Gulf of Mexico loop current and its impact on hurricanes

Dr. Heather Holbach participated as a panelist for the “GRP: Facing an Active 2020 Hurricane Season: Impacts of the Loop Current” virtual webinar hosted by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Gulf Research Program (GRP) on Tuesday, June 2, 2020. Dr. Holbach was joined by panelists Drs. Shuyi Chen. Professor of Atmospheric … Continue reading Heather Holbach participates in webinar about the Gulf of Mexico loop current and its impact on hurricanes

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of May 2020

May's science meeting consisted of six presentations: Michael Fischer: An examination of local shear, vortex tilt, and tropical cyclone intensity change using airborne radar observations Erica Bower: Towards an Automated Approach to Analyzing Extreme Precipitation and Tropical Cyclones Hua Leighton: Ice Particle Size Distributions from Composites of Microphysics Observations Collected in Tropical Cyclones Laura Ko: … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of May 2020

HRD scientists participate in 22nd annual AVAPS Users Group Meeting

The meeting is held annually to present recent work on the technology, science, and operations of dropwindsonde systems.  Participants from around the world attend. HRD scientists gave three presentations, which can be found at ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/pub/hrd/blog/meetings/2020/avaps2020.zip.

Modeling Michael: Using NOAA’s HFV3 to predict rapid intensification of Hurricane Michael

Reposted from https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/news/modeling-michael/ In a recently published study, AOML hurricane researchers used multiple computer model forecasts to gain a better understanding of how Hurricane Michael rapidly intensified to 162 mph before making landfall in the panhandle of Florida. Hurricane Michael is an interesting  case as it intensified despite strong upper-level wind shear, which usually weakens … Continue reading Modeling Michael: Using NOAA’s HFV3 to predict rapid intensification of Hurricane Michael

Paper on how Hurricane Michael (2018) intensified rapidly in the Gulf of Mexico released online in Monthly Weather Review

Weather forecasters use computer models to make predictions. These forecasts of the future depend on knowing what is happening now, what we call initial conditions. However, we can't measure the weather at every location on earth all the time, so we don't know exactly what these initial conditions are. Therefore, we run forecast models many … Continue reading Paper on how Hurricane Michael (2018) intensified rapidly in the Gulf of Mexico released online in Monthly Weather Review

HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

HRD scientists recently attended the 100th American Meteorological Society Meeting in Boston. There, they presented 33 oral presentations and 10 posters. Left to right: Mu-Chich Ko, Andrew Kren, Joe Cione, Karina Apodaca, Michael Mueller, Sarah Ditchek, Steve Diaz, Jonathan Zawislak, Andy Hazelton, Lisa Bucci, Frank Marks, Shirley Murillo, Xuejin Zhang, John Cortinas, Eric Uhlhorn, and … Continue reading HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

AOML Flies Science Missions into Succession of Atlantic Storms

“Many of the storms we flew in 2019 were ‘living on the edge,’ in that they were weak, vertically sheared, but also unpredictable. In previous years, we saw these storms intensify, such as Hurricane Michael in 2018. This season, many struggled to intensify. As we continue to build a dataset of these sheared storms, we … Continue reading AOML Flies Science Missions into Succession of Atlantic Storms

Braving the Eye of the Storm: Research from drone penetration of hurricane eyewall published

Braving the Eye of the Storm Research from drone penetration of hurricane eyewall published The most dangerous part of the hurricane is the eye-wall close to the ocean. It’s where the storm draws energy from heat in the water, which influences how strong – and how quickly – the storm will develop. It’s also where … Continue reading Braving the Eye of the Storm: Research from drone penetration of hurricane eyewall published

New paper on hurricane research with drones highlighted in UCAR/NCAR news

A new paper by a team of scientists, led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), demonstrates that observations just above the surface of the ocean near the eyewall of the storm can improve the performance of hurricane models used by forecasters. Scientists in 2017 and 2018 … Continue reading New paper on hurricane research with drones highlighted in UCAR/NCAR news