Review of aircraft missions into Hurricane Earl

NOAA conducted 20 aircraft missions into Hurricane Earl in late August and early September. The series of flights over 12 days was the longest series of flights into one system that NOAA has conducted. We recently reviewed these flights, and the slides from the review can be found here. Flight tracks of all the NOAA … Continue reading Review of aircraft missions into Hurricane Earl

NOAA completes historic missions into Hurricanes Earl, Fiona, and Ian

Despite the late start to the 2022 Atlantic Hurricane season, NOAA Hurricane Hunters have been very busy flying operational and research missions into and around Hurricanes Earl, Fiona, and Ian during the last few weeks. The crew of NOAA42 before a flight. Credit: Holly Stahl NOAA/AOML HRD scientist Kathryn Sellwood analyzing dropsonde data during the … Continue reading NOAA completes historic missions into Hurricanes Earl, Fiona, and Ian

Happy International Cloud Appreciation Day!

As NOAA begins flights into Tropical Storm Fiona, we want to celebrate the first International Cloud Appreciation Day. Sponsored by the Cloud Appreciation Society, this is an internationally recognized day when people around the world are encouraged to spend a few moments appreciating the beauty of the sky. We thought we'd share some of the … Continue reading Happy International Cloud Appreciation Day!

Paper on assimilating Doppler wind lidar and Doppler radar data into a hurricane model published in Remote Sensing

This study examines the impact of assimilating Doppler Wind Lidar (DWL) data on hurricane prediction in the operational Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting system. A series of experiments were conducted to identify the best way to assimilate the DWL data in comparison to assimilation of Tail Doppler radar data. A new data thinning method was … Continue reading Paper on assimilating Doppler wind lidar and Doppler radar data into a hurricane model published in Remote Sensing

HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

Paper looking at how model forecasts of what is happening near the ocean surface in tropical cyclones changes as the space between forecast points gets smaller published in Monthly Weather Review

The energy that fuels tropical cyclones comes from heat and moisture from the warm ocean below.  This energy is transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere and the momentum is transported from atmosphere to surface by what we call turbulent processes in the atmosphere near the ocean surface (what we call the planetary boundary layer … Continue reading Paper looking at how model forecasts of what is happening near the ocean surface in tropical cyclones changes as the space between forecast points gets smaller published in Monthly Weather Review

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of February 2020

February’s science meeting consisted of seven presentations: Kyle Ahern: Simulated Boundary Layer Structure in Hurricane Earl (2010) After Peak Intensity Udai Shimada: Self-Introduction and Research Plans at HRD Levi Cowan: Comparison of Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Interactions with Upper Tropospheric Jets During Intensification and Weakening Sim Aberson: Multiple vortices as seen in Tropical Cyclone Rina on … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of February 2020

Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

Hurricanes are fed by energy from the warm ocean. The center of a hurricane is surrounded by tall clouds, called cumulus clouds, that produce the heat needed to keep the spin, what we call vorticity, in the hurricanes going. When there are a lot of cumulus clouds around the hurricane's center, the hurricane spins more rapidly. However, … Continue reading Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

HRD Seminar – Dr. Anthony Didlake, Pennsylvania State University – 11 February 2019

Prof. Didlake presented a seminar titled “Asymmetric aspects of secondary eyewall formation in tropical cyclones”. A recording of the presentation is available on the anonymous ftp site: ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/pub/blog/seminars/2019/Didlake_HRD_Seminar_20190211.mp4