HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

Paper looking at how model forecasts of what is happening near the ocean surface in tropical cyclones changes as the space between forecast points gets smaller published in Monthly Weather Review

The energy that fuels tropical cyclones comes from heat and moisture from the warm ocean below.  This energy is transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere and the momentum is transported from atmosphere to surface by what we call turbulent processes in the atmosphere near the ocean surface (what we call the planetary boundary layer … Continue reading Paper looking at how model forecasts of what is happening near the ocean surface in tropical cyclones changes as the space between forecast points gets smaller published in Monthly Weather Review

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of February 2020

February’s science meeting consisted of seven presentations: Kyle Ahern: Simulated Boundary Layer Structure in Hurricane Earl (2010) After Peak Intensity Udai Shimada: Self-Introduction and Research Plans at HRD Levi Cowan: Comparison of Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Interactions with Upper Tropospheric Jets During Intensification and Weakening Sim Aberson: Multiple vortices as seen in Tropical Cyclone Rina on … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of February 2020

Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

Hurricanes are fed by energy from the warm ocean. The center of a hurricane is surrounded by tall clouds, called cumulus clouds, that produce the heat needed to keep the spin, what we call vorticity, in the hurricanes going. When there are a lot of cumulus clouds around the hurricane's center, the hurricane spins more rapidly. However, … Continue reading Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

HRD Seminar – Dr. Anthony Didlake, Pennsylvania State University – 11 February 2019

Prof. Didlake presented a seminar titled “Asymmetric aspects of secondary eyewall formation in tropical cyclones”. A recording of the presentation is available on the anonymous ftp site: ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/pub/blog/seminars/2019/Didlake_HRD_Seminar_20190211.mp4

Paper on how getting turbulence correct in forecast models can improve intensity forecasts in sheared storms published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary:  Though tropical cyclones (TCs) are usually hundreds of miles across, the strongest wind occurs in gusts that can be smaller than 100 yards across, or the size of a football field. We call features that cover such a small area the “turbulent scale.” Other features that are important in forecasting TCs can be as … Continue reading Paper on how getting turbulence correct in forecast models can improve intensity forecasts in sheared storms published in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on low-level downdrafts and their impact on intensity published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: In this study, we looked at radar, thermodynamic (temperature and humidity), and sea surface temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Hurricane Hunter and National Aeronautics and Space Administration aircraft in Hurricane Earl (2010). We found that there are different types of downdrafts (air moving downward) near the strongest part of the … Continue reading Paper on low-level downdrafts and their impact on intensity published in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on how eyewall replacement cycles start published in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary: When hurricanes become strong, they sometimes form a second eyewall around the main eyewall. This second ring of strong winds and heavy rain means that strong, damaging winds could cover a larger area than before. However, it also means that the storm might temporarily weaken. Understanding and predicting this process is therefore very important. … Continue reading Paper on how eyewall replacement cycles start published in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

AOML and HRD researchers at 33rd AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Ponte Vedra, FL – 15-20 April 2018

Thirty-one AOML and HRD scientists participated in the recent 33rd AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology in Ponte Vedra, FL, as authors or co-authors on 65 presentations and 19 posters. Roughly 783 presentations (507 oral presentations in 67 sessions and 276 posters in 2 session) were submitted to the conference. Of the 567 TC-related presentations … Continue reading AOML and HRD researchers at 33rd AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Ponte Vedra, FL – 15-20 April 2018