Meet HRD scientist Gus Alaka

Gus researches the relationship of the large-scale environment with hurricane formation and interactions between multiple storms. He also works closely with numerical hurricane models, including the Hurricane Analysis and Forecast System (HAFS), which is #NOAA’s next-generation hurricane prediction system. He flies on Hurricane Hunter missions to collect critical data that improve hurricane forecasts.  One of Gus’ … Continue reading Meet HRD scientist Gus Alaka

Review of aircraft missions into Hurricane Earl

NOAA conducted 20 aircraft missions into Hurricane Earl in late August and early September. The series of flights over 12 days was the longest series of flights into one system that NOAA has conducted. We recently reviewed these flights, and the slides from the review can be found here. Flight tracks of all the NOAA … Continue reading Review of aircraft missions into Hurricane Earl

Study of what controlled the track of Hurricane Dorian in 2019 released online in Monthly Weather Review

This study looked at a collection (ensemble) of 80 runs of a hurricane model for Hurricane Dorian to learn why some got the forecast right and others got it wrong.  The study shows how useful ensembles can be for understanding how hurricanes move, and also shows that it is critical to forecast what is happening … Continue reading Study of what controlled the track of Hurricane Dorian in 2019 released online in Monthly Weather Review

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of July 2022

July’s science meeting consisted of five presentations: Josh Cossuth (ONR) - "The Geolocated Processing System (GeoIPS) A platform for collaborative development & processing satellite information" Jon Zawislak - "Overview of NASA's 2022 Convective Processes Experiment Cabo Verde (CPEX-CV)" Bruno Rojas (Lapenta Intern) - "Rapid Intensification of Hurricane Dorian Using HEDAS Analyses" Andy Hazelton - "AOML … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of July 2022

NOAA Hurricane Field Program begins with flights into Potential Tropical Cyclone 2 in the Tropical Atlantic

The NOAA flight season began early this year with an operational flight into a system, known as Potential Tropical Cyclone 2, that may soon develop into a tropical depression east of the Windward Islands. The plan for the season was recently released and is available online at https://www.aoml.noaa.gov/2022-hurricane-field-program/, and a kickoff meeting to discuss plans … Continue reading NOAA Hurricane Field Program begins with flights into Potential Tropical Cyclone 2 in the Tropical Atlantic

New study on how landfalling hurricanes can change ocean temperatures near the coast causing the hurricane to intensify published in Geophysical Research Letters

This study uses a state-of-the-art hurricane modeling system developed at the NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory’s Hurricane Research Division, the Basin-Scale Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast (HWRF-B) model, to demonstrate a link between an oceanographic process called coastal downwelling and the intensification of tropical cyclones (TCs or hurricanes) near landfall. We show that coastal downwelling … Continue reading New study on how landfalling hurricanes can change ocean temperatures near the coast causing the hurricane to intensify published in Geophysical Research Letters

Gus Alaka highlighted in the May 2022 issue of the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

You can find more information at https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/2021/11/08/paper-describing-a-new-forecast-model-that-follows-multiple-tropical-cyclones-at-the-same-time-released-online-in-the-bulletin-of-the-american-meteorological-society/or by contacting aoml.communications@noaa.gov.

Paper describing a new forecast model that follows multiple tropical cyclones at the same time highlighted on the cover of the latest Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Forecast models that follow individual tropical cyclones (TCs), like NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) model, have contributed to significant improvement of intensity forecasts for over a decade.  The original HWRF could only follow one TC, but recent advances allow individual multiple nests to follow more than one TC.  This is the first time that the … Continue reading Paper describing a new forecast model that follows multiple tropical cyclones at the same time highlighted on the cover of the latest Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society