Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

For more information, contact aoml.communications@noaa.gov. The article is available at https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0223.1. The authors thank the US NCEP, JTWC, NRL, the Remote Sensing Systems, NOAA NESDIS, the European Union’s Copernicus and the AVISO team, and theArgo team for providing essential data sets. I.-I. L. acknowledges support from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan. R. R. … Continue reading Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

Learn about hurricane dynamics and physics research at AOML

Image of the sea surface from the NOAA Hurricane Hunter P3 aircraft. The destructive potential of a hurricane is governed by its interaction with the environment and physical processes internal to the storm. Researchers at AOML use a variety of tools to better understand how phenomena from the larger environmental scale down to the cloud … Continue reading Learn about hurricane dynamics and physics research at AOML

Article on the eyewall replacement cycle in Hurricane Matthew (2016) highlighted as a Paper of Note in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

A recent paper in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences using ground-based radar and radar aboard NOAA P3 Hurricane Hunter aircraft brings new insight to the eyewall replacement cycle, a process by which an outer eyewall forms, contracts, and replaces the older, inner eyewall. During these cycles, the intensity and location of the strongest winds … Continue reading Article on the eyewall replacement cycle in Hurricane Matthew (2016) highlighted as a Paper of Note in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Paper on the unusual eyewall replacement cycles in Hurricane Irma published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: Accurate forecasts of hurricane strength are necessary to protect people in the path of a storm. The strongest winds in a hurricane are found near the center of the storm, in a ring of dangerous weather called the eyewall. As a hurricane grows older, it is common for the eyewall to eventually weaken and get … Continue reading Paper on the unusual eyewall replacement cycles in Hurricane Irma published in Monthly Weather Review

50th Anniversary of Hurricane Debbie seeding

Hurricane Debbie’s eye as seen from ESSA DC-6 On August 18th and 20th, 1969, Hurricane Debbie was subjected to a seeding experiment as part of Project STORMFURY.  STORMFURY was a joint Navy and Environmental Science Services Administration (ESSA, the predecessor of NOAA) project to test the hypothesis that seeding hurricanes with silver iodide would disrupt … Continue reading 50th Anniversary of Hurricane Debbie seeding

2019 Hurricane Field Program Plan now available

One of the key aspects of NOAA’s Mission is, “To understand and predict changes in the climate, weather, oceans, and coasts...” with a long-term goal of achieving a, “Weather-ready Nation,” in which society is able to prepare for, and respond to, weather-related events. This objective specifies the need to improve the understanding and prediction of … Continue reading 2019 Hurricane Field Program Plan now available