HRD Monthly Science Meeting of June 2021

June's science meeting consisted of six presentations: Nick Mesa (HRD): “Investigating intensity changes related to thermodynamic processes using near-coincident aircraft and satellite observations” Sophie Grimsley (HRD): “Hurricane Intensity Change and Boundary Layer Processes” Chris Landsea (NHC): "Was 2020 a Record-Breaking Hurricane Season?  Yes, but… (Why did the new average number of Named Storms go up … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of June 2021

Paper on the relationship between African dust and hurricane activity published in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

Dust layer associated with the Saharan Air Layer.  Photo taken from the NOAA G-IV northeast of Barbados during a Saharan Air Layer Experiment mission into Hurricane Helene on Sep 16, 2006.  Small cumulus clouds can be seen poking through the tops of the dust layer, which is seen as a milky white haze.  Photo credit: … Continue reading Paper on the relationship between African dust and hurricane activity published in Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of September 2020

September's science meeting consisted of three presentations:  Andy Hazelton - "HAFSV0.1B (HAFS-globalnest) performance for Hurricane Laura: Verification and Evaluation of TC structure"Evan Forde - “Identification of Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones in Proximity to Significant Dry Air Events in Total Precipitable Water Imagery (1987-2015)”Sim Aberson - "In Search of the Elusive Eyewall Me/iso-scale ?" The three presentations are … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of September 2020

NOAA predicts “extremely active” hurricane season in the Atlantic

Atmospheric and oceanic conditions are primed to fuel storm development in the Atlantic, leading to what could be an “extremely active” season, according to forecasters with NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center, a division of the National Weather Service. Today, the agency released its annual August update to the Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook, initially issued in May. … Continue reading NOAA predicts “extremely active” hurricane season in the Atlantic

Paper on the relationship between the Madden-Julian oscillation and rapid intensification of tropical cyclones published in Weather and Forecasting

Summary:   The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an eastward-moving disturbance of clouds, rainfall, wind, and pressure that circles the earth in the tropics and returns to its starting point every 30 to 60 days, on average.  One part of the MJO is stormy and wet and supports the development of thunderstorms, and another part is … Continue reading Paper on the relationship between the Madden-Julian oscillation and rapid intensification of tropical cyclones published in Weather and Forecasting

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of July 2020

July’s science meeting consisted of three presentations: Samantha Michlowitz: "Air-Sea Interactions in Hurricanes: How Much Does the Ocean Cool Underneath the Storm?" Rob Rogers: "Multiscale Aspects of the Different Intensity Evolutions of Two Rapidly Intensifying Typhoons" Stan Goldenberg: "Arthur and Bertha and Cristobal — OH MY!  Dolly and Edouard and Fay (?) — OH MY! … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of July 2020

Busy Atlantic hurricane season predicted for 2020

Multiple climate factors indicate above-normal activity is most likely A summary infographic showing hurricane season probability and numbers of named storms predicted from NOAA's 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season Outlook. Read the news at https://www.noaa.gov/media-release/busy-atlantic-hurricane-season-predicted-for-2020 or watch the video summary at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=asD4wtMj73s.Hurricane preparedness is critically important for the 2020 hurricane season, just as it is every … Continue reading Busy Atlantic hurricane season predicted for 2020