HRD Monthly Science Meeting of February 2019

February’s science meeting consisted of four presentations: Paul Reasor - "Estimating Wind Radii from Tail Doppler Radar" John Kaplan - "Gust Factor Distributions in Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, a Preliminary Analysis Michael Fischer - "Characteristics of Tropical Cyclone Rapid Intensification Events in Environments of Upper-Tropospheric Troughs" Xiaomin Chen - "Structural Changes Leading to Rapid Intensification … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of February 2019

Paper on how getting turbulence correct in forecast models can improve intensity forecasts in sheared storms published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary:  Though tropical cyclones (TCs) are usually hundreds of miles across, the strongest wind occurs in gusts that can be smaller than 100 yards across, or the size of a football field. We call features that cover such a small area the “turbulent scale.” Other features that are important in forecasting TCs can be as … Continue reading Paper on how getting turbulence correct in forecast models can improve intensity forecasts in sheared storms published in Monthly Weather Review

HRD Debrief for missions into Hurricane Michael – 26 October 2018

HRD researchers discussed the results from the 6 P-3 and 3 G-IV missions into Hurricane Michael, AL14 (8-10 October 2018). The agenda for the discussion was: Agenda: Missions Overview (Jon Zawislak) Deployment Overview (Jon Zawislak) 20181008H1 (Kelly Ryan) 20181009H1 (Rob Rogers) 20181009N2 (Jason Dunion/ John Kaplan) 20181009H2/Coyote (Kelly Ryan) 20181010H1 (Rob Rogers/ Jon Zawislak) EMC … Continue reading HRD Debrief for missions into Hurricane Michael – 26 October 2018

HRD observation team monthly meeting – 18 October 2018

The purpose of the observation team meetings is to bring together the people who use observations in their research on a regular basis to discuss issues they’re having, provide updates on observations they’re analyzing or collecting, and any other information that may be of interest to the broader group.  These meetings are also an excellent … Continue reading HRD observation team monthly meeting – 18 October 2018

Small, unmanned aircraft flies into rapidly intensifying Hurricane Michael

  NOAA scientists flew multiple missions into Hurricane Michael in the days before landfall, closely observing the rapid intensification of the storm. Their tools included a small unmanned aircraft, called the Coyote, which flew into the strongest winds of the eyewall as the storm intensified to a category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson scale. NOAA has … Continue reading Small, unmanned aircraft flies into rapidly intensifying Hurricane Michael

HRD Seminar – Kyle Ahern, Florida State University – 4 September 2018

Mr. Ahern presented a seminar titled “Observed and Simulated Boundary Layer Structures in the Hurricane Inner-core During Intensity Change”. ABSTRACT: GPS dropwindsonde data from Atlantic basin aircraft reconnaissance missions (Hock and Franklin 1999) between 1998 and 2015 are gathered to construct composites of the hurricane inner-core boundary layer during modes of intensity change. Sounding information … Continue reading HRD Seminar – Kyle Ahern, Florida State University – 4 September 2018

Paper on low-level downdrafts and their impact on intensity published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: In this study, we looked at radar, thermodynamic (temperature and humidity), and sea surface temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Hurricane Hunter and National Aeronautics and Space Administration aircraft in Hurricane Earl (2010). We found that there are different types of downdrafts (air moving downward) near the strongest part of the … Continue reading Paper on low-level downdrafts and their impact on intensity published in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on turbulence near the ocean surface in Hurricane Rita published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary:Knowing what is happening in the boundary layer of a hurricane (the area from the ocean surface up to about 1 km height) is very important for making accurate forecasts of how strong the hurricane will get. But measuring temperature, moisture, and wind so close to the ocean surface is dangerous and difficult. In the … Continue reading Paper on turbulence near the ocean surface in Hurricane Rita published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences