Paper on the impact of ocean surface waves in intensity forecasts published in The Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans

Ocean surface waves affect the exchange of momentum and energy between the ocean and the atmosphere.  However, the impact on tropical cyclone intensity and structure in fully coupled numerical models has not been well-understood. This study used a regional atmosphere-ocean-wave coupled model to study the wave impacts.  Simulations of 21 real tropical cyclones were conducted. … Continue reading Paper on the impact of ocean surface waves in intensity forecasts published in The Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans

Study that uses buoy and tower data to improve how models forecast the interaction between the atmosphere and ocean in tropical cyclones published in the Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans

Modeling the interaction between the atmosphere and the ocean is important for accurate forecasting of tropical cyclones, especially their intensities.  Because these interactions are so complex, we typically model these interactions using what we call parameterizations to estimate what is really happening.  One parameter, the drag coefficient, is the resistance between motions in the atmosphere … Continue reading Study that uses buoy and tower data to improve how models forecast the interaction between the atmosphere and ocean in tropical cyclones published in the Journal of Geophysical Research Oceans

New study on how landfalling hurricanes can change ocean temperatures near the coast causing the hurricane to intensify published in Geophysical Research Letters

This study uses a state-of-the-art hurricane modeling system developed at the NOAA/Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory’s Hurricane Research Division, the Basin-Scale Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast (HWRF-B) model, to demonstrate a link between an oceanographic process called coastal downwelling and the intensification of tropical cyclones (TCs or hurricanes) near landfall. We show that coastal downwelling … Continue reading New study on how landfalling hurricanes can change ocean temperatures near the coast causing the hurricane to intensify published in Geophysical Research Letters

Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

For more information, contact aoml.communications@noaa.gov. The article is available at https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0223.1. The authors thank the US NCEP, JTWC, NRL, the Remote Sensing Systems, NOAA NESDIS, the European Union’s Copernicus and the AVISO team, and theArgo team for providing essential data sets. I.-I. L. acknowledges support from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan. R. R. … Continue reading Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons published in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

Jun Zhang participates in 2nd Boundary Layer Workshop

The 2nd Boundary Layer Workshop was held virtually on 1-2 June. The goal of the workshop is to continue the work from the previous one to improve our understanding and modeling of surface and atmospheric boundary layer processes. The event was organized by Tilden Meyers of NOAA's Air Resource's Laboratory and David Turner of NOAA's … Continue reading Jun Zhang participates in 2nd Boundary Layer Workshop

HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist … Continue reading HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

Paper that reviews what we know about intensity change published in Atmosphere

This paper is an overview of what we currently know about processes important in tropical cyclone intensity change and the research that has been done during the past 15 years using aircraft data. The paper describes the eye and eyewall and how they change in time, the region close to the ocean surface where the … Continue reading Paper that reviews what we know about intensity change published in Atmosphere

Paper looking at how model forecasts of what is happening near the ocean surface in tropical cyclones changes as the space between forecast points gets smaller published in Monthly Weather Review

The energy that fuels tropical cyclones comes from heat and moisture from the warm ocean below.  This energy is transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere and the momentum is transported from atmosphere to surface by what we call turbulent processes in the atmosphere near the ocean surface (what we call the planetary boundary layer … Continue reading Paper looking at how model forecasts of what is happening near the ocean surface in tropical cyclones changes as the space between forecast points gets smaller published in Monthly Weather Review

New study on how energy from the warm ocean fuels hurricanes published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: The energy that fuels tropical cyclones comes from the heat and moisture in the warm ocean water below.  In a classical theory for tropical cyclone intensification, called Wind Induced Surface Heat Exchange or WISHE, an increase in surface wind speed allows for greater energy transfer from the ocean to the atmosphere (Fig. 1a). This … Continue reading New study on how energy from the warm ocean fuels hurricanes published in Monthly Weather Review