HRD Seminar – Dr. Jason Dunion, CIMAS and AOML/HRD – 4 May 2017

Dr. Dunion presented a seminar titled  “The Tropical Cyclone Diurnal Cycle: The Great Hurricane Exhale”. Abstract: New geostationary infrared satellite imagery has revealed a curious diurnal pulsing pattern in tropical cyclones (TCs) that may represent an unrealized, yet fundamental process of mature TCs.  These diurnal pulses begin forming in the storm’s inner core near the time […]

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HRD Seminar – Kelly Ryan, CIMAS and AOML/HRD – 27 April 2017

Kelly Ryan presented a seminar titled  “Using OSSEs to Improve NOAA G-IV Synoptic Surveillance Targeting for Tropical Cyclones”. Abstract: Aircraft reconnaissance missions remain the only means of collecting direct measurements of marine atmospheric conditions affecting tropical cyclone formation and evolution. The National Hurricane Center tasks the NOAA G-IV aircraft to sample environmental conditions that may impact […]

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HRD Seminar – Dr. Mahsa Mirzargar, University of Miami Department of Computer Science – 27 April 2017

Dr. Mirzargar  presented a seminar on “Uncertainty Characterization, Visualization, and Validation of Ensemble Forecasts Using Data Depth”. Abstract: When computational models or predictive simulations are used, researchers, analysts and decision makers are not only interested in understanding the data but also interested in understanding the uncertainty present in the data as well. In such situations, […]

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Greater Miami AMS Chapter/HRD Seminar – Dr. Frank Marks, AOML/HRD – 26 April 2017

The Greater Miami Chapter of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) held their meeting Wednesday, April 26, 2017 at the AOML Laboratory.  The featured speaker was Dr. Frank Marks,  Director of the AOML/Hurricane Research Division. Dr. Marks presented a seminar on “Landfalling Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Distributions”. Abstract: Rainfall-induced freshwater flooding associated with landfalling tropical cyclones (TCs) […]

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Two part paper on convective bursts in hurricanes released online in Monthly Weather Review

These two papers analyze extreme upward air currents, called “convective bursts,” in hurricanes that have been believed to be important for hurricane intensification. We use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to look at convective bursts in two hurricanes: Hurricane Dean from 2007 and Hurricane Bill from 2009. In the first paper, we study […]

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Paper on the new basin-scale version of HWRF developed at HRD released online in Weather and Forecasting

The Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting Model (HWRF) has become an important tool for both hurricane forecasters and researchers. The current HWRF has three domains around only one tropical cyclone. Its inner domain makes forecasts on a grid with points 2 km apart and follows the tropical cyclone during the forecast. During hurricane season in […]

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HRD Seminar – Drs. Anu Simon and Andrew Penny, NWS/National Hurricane Center – 24 April 2017

Drs. Simon and Penny presented a seminar on “An evaluation of the HFIP Corrected Consensus Approach (HCCA) for tropical cyclone track and intensity forecasts”. Abstract: Prior to the 2015 hurricane season, the Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project (HFIP) Corrected Consensus Approach (HCCA) was implemented at the National Hurricane Center (NHC) as an “in-house” guidance product for […]

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HRD observation team monthly meeting – 20 April 2017

The purpose of the observation team meetings is to bring together the people who use observations in their research on a regular basis to discuss issues they’re having, provide updates on observations they’re analyzing or collecting, and any other information that may be of interest to the broader group.  These meetings are also an excellent […]

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Paper on gravity waves caused by hurricanes and a potential new way to estimate hurricane intensity released online in Geophysical Research Letters

 Summary: Observing tropical cyclones around the world can be very expensive because they occur over oceans where there are few observations. Hurricane Hunter aircraft can reach hurricanes only when they are close to land. Thunderstorms near the centers of tropical cyclones cause waves (called “gravity waves”) in the atmosphere that move outward in spiral […]

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Paper on changes to the intensity of tropical waves during the hurricane season released online in the Journal of Climate

African easterly waves (AEWs) are areas of low air pressure that move westward across North Africa and into the Atlantic Ocean. AEWs can cause intense thunderstorms, and, once over the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean, they may become tropical cyclones that might affect the Caribbean and North America. In summer, many AEWs form in, […]

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