Paper on how tropical cyclones in shear intensify published in Geophysical Research Letters

Summary: Tropical cyclones (TCs) are made up of thunderstorms (what we call convection), and these storms have strong winds moving up and down (what we call up- and downdrafts). Dry air enhances evaporative cooling (the same process that cools people when they sweat) from convective downdrafts, reducing the temperature and humidity in low levels; this … Continue reading Paper on how tropical cyclones in shear intensify published in Geophysical Research Letters

50th Anniversary of Hurricane Camille

On the night of August 17-18th, 1969, Hurricane Camille came howling into Waveland, MS, with estimated sustained winds of 175 mph (280 km/hr) and a storm surge of 24 feet (7.3 m) to become the second strongest hurricane on record to make landfall in the United States (after the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935).  Camille also … Continue reading 50th Anniversary of Hurricane Camille

Jun Zhang and Rob Rogers honored with Banner I. Miller Award

The American Meteorological Society has announced that Dr. Jun Zhang, Dr. David S. Nolan, Dr. Robert F. Rogers, and Dr. Vijay S. Tallapragada have won the 2020 Banner I.  Miller Award for their paper, “Evaluating the impact of improvements in the boundary layer parameterization on hurricane intensity and structure forecasts in HWRF,” which significantly advanced … Continue reading Jun Zhang and Rob Rogers honored with Banner I. Miller Award

2019 Hurricane Field Program Plan now available

One of the key aspects of NOAA’s Mission is, “To understand and predict changes in the climate, weather, oceans, and coasts...” with a long-term goal of achieving a, “Weather-ready Nation,” in which society is able to prepare for, and respond to, weather-related events. This objective specifies the need to improve the understanding and prediction of … Continue reading 2019 Hurricane Field Program Plan now available