Paper on measuring surface wind speed from hurricane hunter aircraft when it turns and rolls released online in the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology

Summary: The Stepped-Frequency Microwave Radiometer (SFMR) is an instrument flown on the NOAA and Air Force Hurricane Hunter aircraft that measures surface wind speed and how much rain is falling over the ocean in tropical cyclones.  Historically, the SFMR measurements have only been used when the aircraft is not turning or going up or down … Continue reading Paper on measuring surface wind speed from hurricane hunter aircraft when it turns and rolls released online in the Journal of Atmospheric and Oceanic Technology

Paper on low-level downdrafts and their impact on intensity released online in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: In this study, we looked at radar, thermodynamic (temperature and humidity), and sea surface temperature data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Hurricane Hunter and National Aeronautics and Space Administration aircraft in Hurricane Earl (2010). We found that there are different types of downdrafts (air moving downward) near the strongest part of the … Continue reading Paper on low-level downdrafts and their impact on intensity released online in Monthly Weather Review

35th Anniversary of Hurricane Alicia

In the early morning hours of August 18, 1983, Hurricane Alicia made landfall at San Luis Pass, Texas, just southwest of the Galveston area.  Its 115 mph (185 km/hr) winds slammed the high rises of Houston leaving billions of dollars in damage in its wake. Like many tropical storms that form during low-activity years, Alicia … Continue reading 35th Anniversary of Hurricane Alicia

Paper on how eyewall replacement cycles start published in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary: When hurricanes become strong, they sometimes form a second eyewall around the main eyewall. This second ring of strong winds and heavy rain means that strong, damaging winds could cover a larger area than before. However, it also means that the storm might temporarily weaken. Understanding and predicting this process is therefore very important. … Continue reading Paper on how eyewall replacement cycles start published in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences