Study showing the impact of turbulence in computer forecasts of hurricanes released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary:  Turbulence is made up of random and continuously changing wind.  It is important in tropical cyclones because turbulence in the lowest 1-2 km of the atmosphere (the planetary boundary layer or PBL) and in clouds affects tropical cyclone intensity and structural change. Meteorologists use computer models to forecast the weather, including tropical cyclones.  These … Continue reading Study showing the impact of turbulence in computer forecasts of hurricanes released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Study on how to improve model forecasts of the region closest to the ocean surface released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary:  Turbulence is made up of random and continuously changing wind.  It is important in tropical cyclones (TCs) because turbulence in the lowest 1-2 km of the free atmosphere (the planetary boundary layer or PBL) affects TC intensity and structural change. Meteorologists use computer models to forecast the weather, including TCs. These models forecast the … Continue reading Study on how to improve model forecasts of the region closest to the ocean surface released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Study on the impact of the new CYGNSS satellites on hurricane forecasts released online in Monthly Weather Review

Part of the difficulty of forecasting tropical cyclone (TC) track and intensity (where the TC is going and how strong it will be) stems from the lack of frequent, accurate observations over tropical oceans where TCs form and develop. While Hurricane Hunter aircraft can collect vital observations in and near TCs, those observations are limited … Continue reading Study on the impact of the new CYGNSS satellites on hurricane forecasts released online in Monthly Weather Review

Study shows for the first time how and where dry air in the tropical cyclone core can impact intensity. Paper released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

In the middle atmosphere in and around tropical cyclones, around 2 to 5 km above the surface, air is cooler and drier than near the ocean surface. It is well known that this cool, dry air can be brought down toward the surface by heavy rain in thunderstorms, where the air flows toward the tropical … Continue reading Study shows for the first time how and where dry air in the tropical cyclone core can impact intensity. Paper released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons released online in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society

For more information, contact aoml.communications@noaa.gov. The article is available at https://doi.org/10.1175/BAMS-D-20-0223.1. The authors thank the US NCEP, JTWC, NRL, the Remote Sensing Systems, NOAA NESDIS, the European Union’s Copernicus and the AVISO team, and theArgo team for providing essential data sets. I.-I. L. acknowledges support from the Ministry of Science and Technology, Taiwan. R. R. … Continue reading Paper on two rapidly intensifying typhoons released online in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society