Jason Dunion’s presentation at the most recent AMS Hurricane Conference highlighted in the December 2018 issue of the AMS Bulletin

At the recent American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, Jason presented his work with co-authors Chris Thorncroft, Chris Velden, and Brian McNoldy about the diurnal cycle of convection in hurricanes.  This cycle is a dramatic outward expansion of clouds that begins moving away from the storm center each day around sunset and … Continue reading Jason Dunion’s presentation at the most recent AMS Hurricane Conference highlighted in the December 2018 issue of the AMS Bulletin

Paper on the Doppler Wind Lidar, a new instrument to measure wind from hurricane hunter aircraft, published in the journal Sensors

Summary: A new instrument, called an airborne Doppler Wind Lidar (ADWL, for short), was flown on NOAA’s hurricane hunter aircraft into two storms during 2016. This instrument measures winds above and below the plane. The ADWL measures wind where radar on the aircraft cannot: the radar can measure the wind where there are clouds or … Continue reading Paper on the Doppler Wind Lidar, a new instrument to measure wind from hurricane hunter aircraft, published in the journal Sensors

Paper on possible improvements to forecasts from additional radio-occultation satellite data published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) are a set of satellites that were launched in 2006 and orbit the earth about 500 miles above ground. They use radio signals from Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites in a process called “radio occultation” to measure temperature and moisture with high accuracy every 100 … Continue reading Paper on possible improvements to forecasts from additional radio-occultation satellite data published in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on a new way to assess how well model forecasts are doing, showing improvements since 2015, published in Weather and Forecasting

Summary:  Forecasters use computer models to help predict the weather.  One important and simple way to see how good the computer forecasts are is to check how good predictions of where the high and low pressure systems are at a level about 5.5 km (3.5 miles) above the surface of the earth. But this doesn't … Continue reading Paper on a new way to assess how well model forecasts are doing, showing improvements since 2015, published in Weather and Forecasting