Paper on how eyewall replacement cycles start published in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary: When hurricanes become strong, they sometimes form a second eyewall around the main eyewall. This second ring of strong winds and heavy rain means that strong, damaging winds could cover a larger area than before. However, it also means that the storm might temporarily weaken. Understanding and predicting this process is therefore very important. …

75th Anniversary of first ‘real time’ hurricane fix from an aircraft

On August 16, 1943 information from an Army Air Force flight into a tropical storm east of Miami was relayed in ‘real time’ to the Joint Miami Hurricane Warning Center and the information was used to update their analyses. This was the first time a center position of a tropical cyclone was 'fixed' by aircraft …

Paper on turbulence near the ocean surface in Hurricane Rita released online the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary:Knowing what is happening in the boundary layer of a hurricane (the area from the ocean surface up to about 1 km height) is very important for making accurate forecasts of how strong the hurricane will get. But measuring temperature, moisture, and wind so close to the ocean surface is dangerous and difficult. In the …

Paper on the impact of new satellite wind velocity data on hurricane forecasts published in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: The CYclone Global Navigation Satellite System (CYGNSS) was launched into space on December 15, 2016, to improve hurricane (tropical cyclone) forecasts by measuring wind speed on the ocean surface. Since the tropical cyclones mostly occur over oceans where other wind data are usually not available, the new observations can measure their wind speeds. This …

Paper on the direct measurement of important air-sea interaction parameters in tropical cyclones published in the Journal of Geophysical Research

Summary:Friction is what happens when two things rub up against each other; when this happens, they release heat. When this happens in the atmosphere, we call it “dissipative heating.” Tropical cyclones (TCs) mainly gather energy from the warm ocean at the boundary layer, the region from the surface of the ocean to an altitude of …

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of August 2018

August’s science meeting consisted of five presentations: Andrew Kren - HAMSR retrieval assimilation in the GSI system Josh Wadler (UM/RSMAS)- A Characterization of Turbulent Kinetic Energy and its Generation in Idealized Tropical Cyclone Simulations Gus Alaka - The Basin-Scale HWRF: 2018 HFIP Real-Time Demos Miguel Cortez – Summer 2018 Nerto update Stan Goldenberg - August …

Paper on the impact of Global Hawk dropsondes data on global model forecasts released online in Weather and Forecasting

Summary: The Global Hawk, a drone or unmanned aircraft system (UAS), has been used since 2010 to gather data to improve forecasts. The Global Hawk can release dropsondes that measure temperature, pressure, humidity, and wind up to four times every second, starting at an altitude of up to 60,000 feet until it falls to the …