Paper on the ability of forecast models to predict the extreme rainfall from Hurricane Harvey (2017) released Atmosphere

Hurricane Harvey brought up to 5 feet of rainfall to Texas and Louisiana in just a few days in 2017. The strongest rainfall typically happens near the center (eye) of a hurricane. Hurricane Harvey’s rainfall was unusually located far away from the eye. These unusual events make it difficult for forecast models to correctly predict … Continue reading Paper on the ability of forecast models to predict the extreme rainfall from Hurricane Harvey (2017) released Atmosphere

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of June 2020

June's science meeting consisted of six presentations: Jason Sippel: "Some thoughts about recent G-IV impact results" Sarah Ditchek: "Quantifying the Radial Impact of Dropsondes Using the Basin-Scale HWRF" Dave Nolan: "Evaluation of the Surface Wind Field Over Land in WRF Simulations of Hurricane Wilma (2005)" Lakemariam Worku: "Forecasting a Continuum Environmental Threats - Tropical Cyclone … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of June 2020

Hurricane Field Program Update — Friday, June 6, 2020, 10pm EDT

The NOAA Hurricane Hunters took off at 4PM EDT today from Lakeland, FL for their final reconnaissance mission into Tropical Storm Cristobal. Due to the asymmetric nature of precipitation in the storm, both the dropsondes and the tail Doppler radar played an important role collecting critical data needed for analysis of the Cristobal. For this … Continue reading Hurricane Field Program Update — Friday, June 6, 2020, 10pm EDT

Hurricane Field Program Update — Friday, June 5, 2020, 10pm EDT

Tropical Storm Cristobal became the Atlantic Hurricane Season’s third named storm and has already produced damaging and deadly flooding in Central America. The system’s center emerged over water and quickly returned to tropical storm strength. Due to the storm’s location and characteristics, preparations were swiftly coordinated with the National Hurricane Center, Environmental Modeling Center, and … Continue reading Hurricane Field Program Update — Friday, June 5, 2020, 10pm EDT

2020 Hurricane Field Program Plan Released

The 2020 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially begins today, and HRD has released its annual Field Program Plan in suppler of the Intensity Forecasting EXperiment (IFEX). IFEX has been developed in partnership with NOAA’s Environmental Modeling Center and the National Hurricane Center. Its goal is to better our understanding and prediction of hurricane intensity change by … Continue reading 2020 Hurricane Field Program Plan Released

Rob Rogers commended for work with the NOAA Budget Formulation and Execution Team

During his participation with Leadership Competencies Development Program, Rob Rogers was working with NOAA’s Budget Formulation and Execution Team, which received commendation from NOAA leadership. Ben Friedman, Department of Commerce Deputy Undersecretary for Operations states that the team has gone above and beyond to minimize and mitigate the impacts of COVID-19 to NOAA’s budget. Despite … Continue reading Rob Rogers commended for work with the NOAA Budget Formulation and Execution Team

Paper on the potential impact of radio-occultation data on tropical cyclone forecasts released online in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: Radio Occultation (RO) is a technique used to gather information on atmospheric temperature and moisture by seeing how signals from satellites change as they travel through the atmosphere. This study looks at how RO data from a proposed satellite system might improve weather model forecasts of where hurricanes will go (called track forecasts) and … Continue reading Paper on the potential impact of radio-occultation data on tropical cyclone forecasts released online in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on how the regions closest to the surface changed during the landfall of Hurricane Irene in 2011 released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary: Objects on land and the land itself cause wind to be weaker at the surface than above due to friction.  In hurricanes, the strongest wind occurs where friction is no longer important, near the top of a region we call the boundary layer.  Some people live close to the surface, but others live in … Continue reading Paper on how the regions closest to the surface changed during the landfall of Hurricane Irene in 2011 released online in The Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences