HRD Monthly Science Meeting of April 2018

April’s science meeting consisted of five presentations: Andrew Kren - Impact of Global Hawk dropsonde data assimilated in the NCEP GFS model during SHOUT: Hurricanes Matthew and Nicole in 2016 Hui Christophersen - Impact of Global Hawk Dropsondes on Tropical Cyclone Analyses and Forecasts Sim Aberson -  1-km HEDAS analysis of Hurricane Patricia just after peak …

Best Student Poster at AMS 33rd Hurricane Conference

The Best Student Poster for Mesoscale Meteorology Award at the AMS 33rd Hurricane and Tropical Meteorology Conference was awarded to University of Utah student George (Trey) Alvey III and co-authored by HRD's Rob Rogers and Jon Zawislak along with U. Utah Professor Ed Zipser.  The poster was titled "Hurricane Edouard's (2014) Intensification: The Relationship between …

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of March 2018

March’s science meeting consisted of four presentations: Josh Wadler, UM/RSMAS: Downdrafts and the Evolution of Boundary Layer Thermodynamics in Hurricane Earl (2010) Before and During Rapid Intensification Ghassan Alaka: Evaluation of Track Spread in Hurricane Joaquin (2015) Heather Holbach: Dropsonde Wind Speed Comparison to SFMR at Coyote Flight Levels Kelly Ryan-Poterjoy: Coyote Thermodynamic Verification using …

NOAA Hurricane Research overview for WMO Region IV Training Workshop, NHC – 26 February 2018

To demonstrate how tropical cyclone research is used to improve forecast guidance HRD researchers Drs. Frank Marks, Robert Rogers, and Jason Sippel presented summaries of “NOAA’s Hurricane Research”, “Aircraft Observations of Tropical Cyclones”, and  "Tropical Cyclone Modeling and Data Assimilation"  to the World Meteorological Organization Regional Association IV Training Workshop held in the National Hurricane …

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of February 2018

February’s science meeting consisted of three presentations: Rob Rogers: The relationship between tropical cyclone structure and intensification in moderate vertical shear Jon Zawislak: 2018 NOAA/AOML/HRD Hurricane Field Program Intensity Forecast Experiment (IFEX): Overview of Experiment Design Pete Black: Emerging Airborne Technologies for improved TC Track and Intensity Forecasting: Preliminary Observations from SHOUT and EPOCH All the …

Paper on the difference between rapidly intensifying storms and those that don’t intensify as fast published in Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences

Summary: The main model that forecasters use to predict what a hurricane will do is the Hurricane Weather Research and Forecast (HWRF) model. Because we cannot measure what is currently happening in the hurricane exactly, we run the model many times at once with different measurements to get an idea of the different forecasts that …

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of January 2018

January’s science meeting consisted of three presentations: Jon Zawislak:  Preliminary results on the sources of condensate in the hurricane outflow layer Sim Aberson:  Observations of gravity waves in tropical cyclones Jason Dunion:  Assessing tropical cyclone intensity change in moderate vertical wind shear using dropsondes: thermodynamics of the lower troposphere All the presentations are available on …

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of December 2017

December’s science meeting consisted of three presentations: Dave Nolan:  Preliminary results on the sources of condensate in the hurricane outflow layer Jun Zhang:  Observations of gravity waves in tropical cyclones Leon Nguyen:  Assessing tropical cyclone intensity change in moderate vertical wind shear using dropsondes: thermodynamics of the lower troposphere All the presentations are available on …

HRD Seminar – Dr. Morgan O’Neill, T. C. Chamberlin Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Chicago – 14 November 2017

Dr. O'Neill presented a seminar on “Diurnal gravity waves as a probe of hurricanes’ internal structure“. Abstract: Satellite observations of cloudy hurricane canopies have shown a universal, daily, wave-like feature that propagates radially outward, as far as 600 km (Dunion et al. 2014). Daytime solar heating of a hurricane’s upper eyewall is surely responsible, but …