NOAA Researchers fly a series of missions into Hurricane Ian

Outer rainband of Hurricane Ian as seen from NOAA 43 “Miss Piggy”

Scientists from NOAA’s Hurricane Research Division and NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service have flown a series of missions into Hurricane Ian from the time it was a tropical depression in the eastern Caribbean. On board both NOAA P3s (Kermit & Miss Piggy), they have documented its growth into a hurricane now moving over western Cuba, and will continue researching Ian until the storm makes landfall.

The eye of Hurricane Ian is seen on the left side of this radar image taken from NOAA 43 (Miss Piggy). It appears there are concentric eyewalls marking a cycle of eyewall replacement often noted in mature hurricanes.

In addition to the P3 flights, NOAA 49 (Gonzo) has flown several Synoptic Surveillance missions, in which dropwindsondes are deployed around the hurricane to map out the steering currents. The data from these probes are fed into various computer forecast models in an effort to improve the output.

For the latest information about Hurricane Ian, tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center.

Media inquiries should be directed to AOML Communications (aoml.communications@noaa.gov), or Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director, Frank Marks (Frank.Marks@noaa.gov).

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