HRD scientists participate in the 34th American Meteorological Society Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting


The 34th AMS Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology was held virtually 10-14 May after being postponed from 2020. This is the premiere meeting for operational and research scientists who work on understanding and forecasting tropical cyclones and other tropical weather around the world. HRD scientist Jason Dunion served on the programming committee for this meeting. The meeting was held with the 13th AMS Symposium on Fire and Forest Meteorology.

HRD scientists authored or co-authored 45 of the pre-recorded oral presentations and ten of the live poster presentations during the meeting. The pre-recorded talks are currently available to those registered for the conference, and will be publicly available by the end of 2021. A full list of oral presentations and posters is below; presenting authors are in bold.

In addition, 13 conference sessions were chaired or co-chaired by HRD scientists, nine HRD scientists served on awards committees, and one led a networking session for attendees.

The next conference will be held 9-13 May, 2022, in New Orleans. Rob Rogers has been selected to chair the committee arranging that meeting.

34th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology Virtual Meeting

Oral presentations involving HRD scientists at the conference:

1.4 The Hurricane Forecast Improvement Project: Progress in Hurricane Prediction Since Hurricane Katrina (Invited Presentation). Frank Marks, Hurricane Research Division, AOML, Miami, FL

2B.1 Advances in Hurricane Forecast Models under NOAA Hurricane Forecast Improvement Program (HFIP). Sundararaman Gopalakrishnan, NOAA/AOML/HRD , Miami, FL; A. Mehra, Y. Jung, F. Marks, D. Koch, S. Upadhayay

2B.4 What Caused the Uncertainty in the Early-Stage Forecasts of Hurricane Dorian? Andrew Hazelton, CIMAS and AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; G. J. Alaka Jr., S. Gopalakrishnan, F. D. Marks, L. Cowan, M. Fischer

2B.5 What Resolution Is Optimal for Track Forecasts of Tropical Cyclones in the Hurricane Analysis and Forecasting System? Xuejin Zhang, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; B. Liu, A. Hazelton, W. Ramstrom, S. Gopalakrishnan, A. Mehra, F. D. Marks, V. Tallapragada

2B.6 Moving Nest Development in FV3GFS. William Ramstrom, RSMAS, Miami, FL; X. Zhang, S. Gopalakrishnan, R. Benson, L. Harris

2B.9 Capturing Multi-Storm and Multi-Scale Interactions for Tropical Cyclone Intensity Predictions. Ghassan J. Alaka, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; B. Thomas, L. Gramer, S. Gopalakrishnan, A. Mehra

3C.2 Recent Advances in Operational HWRF Data Assimilation. Jason Sippel, AOML, Miami, FL; Z. Zhang, L. Bi, A. Mehra

3C.5 Enhancing the Prediction of Landfalling Hurricanes Through Improved Data Assimilation with HWRF and the Hybrid 3DEnVar System. Zhaoxia Pu, Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City , UT; Y. Wang, X. Li, J. A. Zhang, L. Bi, A. Mehra, V. Tallapragada

4B.1 Hurricane Forecast Improvement Program (HFIP): the Unified Forecast System (UFS) and the next-generation Hurricane Analysis. Youngsun Jung, Office of Science and Technology Integration, Silver Spring, MD; D. Koch, E. Rappaport, V. Tallapragada, F. Marks, A. Mehra, S. Gopalakrishnan, S. Upadhayay

4C.3 The Thermodynamic Influence of Downdrafts on the Tropical Cyclone Boundary Layer Using Idealized Simulations with Moderate Wind Shear. Joshua B. Wadler, RSMAS, University of Miami, Miami, FL; D. S. Nolan, J. Zhang, L. K. Shay

4C.4 Boundary Layer Recovery and Precipitation Symmetrization Preceding Rapid Intensification of Tropical Cyclones in Shear. Xiaomin Chen, NOAA, Miami, FL; J. F. Gu, J. A. Zhang, F. D. Marks, R. F. Rogers, J. J. Cione

4C.5 Observed Evolution of Thermodynamic and Precipitation Properties During Tropical Cyclone Intensity Change. Jonathan Zawislak, Univ. of Miami/Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies and
NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; R. F. Rogers, J. Y. Ge, G. R. Alvey III

4C.6 Precipitation Processes and Vortex Alignment during the Intensification of a Weak Tropical Cyclone in Moderate Vertical Shear. Robert F. Rogers, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; P. D. Reasor, J. Zawislak, M. S. Fischer, L. T. Nguyen

4C. 9 Stabilization of Tropical Cyclones Against Vertical Wind Shear by Asymmetric Diabatic Heat Release. Tom Doerffel, Free Univ. Berlin, Berlin, Germany; R. Klein, S. Gopalakrishnan, D. S. Nolan

5B.4 Processes Underlying the Vortex Repositioning during Dorian’s (2019) Early Stages That Increased Its Favorability for Rapid Intensification. George R. Alvey, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies, University of Miami, and NOAA/AOML/HRD, MIAMI BEACH, FL; M. Fischer, P. Reasor, R. F. Rogers, J. Zawislak

5B.5 Vertical Alignment or Redevelopment? Recent Case Studies Using High-Resolution HEDAS Analyses. Sim Aberson, AOML, Miami, FL; A. Aksoy, K. Sellwood, M. Fischer

5B.6 Relationships Between Vortex Tilt, Convective Structure, and Intensity Change in Early-Stage Tropical Cyclones. Michael S. Fischer, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; R. F. Rogers, P. D. Reasor, J. P. Dunion

5C.9 Examining the Coastal Transition of the Hurricane Boundary Layer During Hurricane Irene (2011). A. Addison Alford, Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK; J. A. Zhang, M. I. Biggerstaff, P. P. Dodge, F. D. Marks, D. J. Bodine, G. D. Carrie

6B.2 Towards the Use of GOES GLM Lightning for Tropical Cyclone Intensity Prediction. Stephanie N. Stevenson, CIRA/NHC, Miami, FL; C. J. Slocum, M. DeMaria, M. S. Fischer, K. L. Corbosiero

6B.6 Multi-Storm Analysis of Convective Rainband Characteristics Using Airborne Radar Observations. Nicholas R. Barron, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA; A. C. Didlake Jr., P. D. Reasor

6C.2 Improvements to the Probabilistic Storm Surge Model (P-Surge). Andrew B. Penny, UCAR / National Hurricane Center, Miami, FL; L. P. Alaka, C. L. Fritz, J. Rhome, A. A. Taylor

7C.6 Impacts of CYGNSS v2.1, v3.0 and NOAA L2 Winds on Analyses and Forecasts of Tropical Cyclones in Regional OSEs. Bachir Annane, University of Miami and NOAA/AOML, Miami, FL; S. M. Leidner, R. N. Hoffman, R. Atlas, L. Cucurull, B. D. McNoldy, S. Majumdar

8A.1 Impacts of Assimilating Airborne Doppler Wind Lidar data into NOAA’s Hurricane Weather Research and Forecasting (HWRF) System. Lisa Bucci, NOAA, Miami, FL; S. Majumdar, R. Atlas, B. A. Dahl, G. D. Emmitt, S. A. Wood

8A.2 Impact of Tail Doppler Radar Observations on the Prediction of Tropical Cyclone Structure. Kelly Ryan, NOAA/AOML and Univ. of Miami, Miami, FL; J. Sippel, L. Cucurull

8A.3 Assimilation of Global Hawk UAS HIWRAP Radar Horizontal Wind Profiles Collected During the 2016 SHOUT Field Campaign. Kathryn Sellwood, University of Miami CIMAS and NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; C. N. Helms, B. A. Dahl, A. Aksoy, L. Cucurull, G. Wick

8A.4 A Systematic Assessment of Dropsonde Impact during the 2017-2019 Hurricane Seasons using the Basin-Scale HWRF. Sarah D. Ditchek, Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies and Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory, Miami, FL; J. A. Sippel, G. J. Alaka Jr., K. Apodaca, L. Cucurull

8A.5 A Composite Assessment of the Coyote sUAS Observations for Tropical Cyclone Data Assimilation and Prediction. Altug Aksoy, University of Miami/CIMAS and NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; J. J. Cione, B. A. Dahl, K. Sellwood

8A.6 Eye of the Storm: Observing Hurricanes with a Small Unmanned Aircraft System. Joseph J. Cione, AOML, Miami, FL; G. H. Bryan, R. J. Dobosy, J. Zhang, G. deBoer, A. Aksoy, J. B. Wadler, E. A. Kalina, B. A. Dahl, K. Ryan, J. Neuhaus, E. Dumas, F. D. Marks, A. Farber, T. Hock, X. Chen

8A.7 First Eddy-Covariance Derivation of Momentum Flux in a Hurricane Eyewall Below 200 m. Ronald J. Dobosy, Dobosy Turbulence, Oak Ridge, TN; J. Zhang, J. J. Cione, G. deBoer, A. Farber, G. H. Bryan, J. Wadler, X. Chen

8A.8 Evaluation of HRD Automated Airborne-Doppler Quality-Control and Analysis System, Using Dropwindsondes and Separate Analyses from Two WP-3D Aircraft. John F. Gamache, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; P. D. Reasor

8B.4 Rapid Intensification of Super typhoon Hagibis (2019). I. I. Lin, National Taiwan Univ., Taipei, Taiwan; R. Rogers, H. C. Huang, Y. C. Liao, D. C. Herndon, J. Y. Yu, Y. T. Chang, J. Zhang, C. M. Patricola, I. F. Pun, C. C. Lien

8C.5 SST, SST-cooling, and new predictors in the Operational Statistical Tropical Cyclone Intensity Forecast Models. Galina Chirokova, CIRA / Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO; M. DeMaria, J. J. Cione, G. R. Foltz, J. Kaplan, J. Knaff

10C.1 Structural Evolution of Hurricane Earl’s (2010) Boundary Layer Following Peak Intensity in a Full-Physics Simulation. Kyle Ahern, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL; M. A. Bourassa, R. E. Hart

10C.3 Doppler Radar Observations of the Symmetric Hurricane Boundary Layer Structure. Jun A. Zhang, Univ. of Miami/Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies and NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; R. F. Rogers

10C.8A Characteristics of Gravity Waves in Hurricanes from Surface Weather Station Observations. Jun A. Zhang, Univ. of Miami/Cooperative Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Studies and NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; D. S. Nolan

13C.2 Development of a Probabilistic Tropical Cyclone Rainfall Model. Frank Marks, Hurricane Research Division, AOML, Miami, FL; B. McNoldy, M. C. Ko, A. B. Schumacher

15A.5 Observed Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions During Hurricane Michael Over the Gulf. Lynn K. Shay, Univ. of Miami/RSMAS, Miami, FL; B. Jaimes, J. B. Wadler, L. Centurioni, J. Zhang, J. Brewster, L. Hiron

15C.8 Thermodynamic Evolution in Developing and Nondeveloping Tropical Disturbances Observed from Passive Infrared and Microwave Sensors. Jimmy Yunge, Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science, Miami, FL; J. Zawislak

16C.8 Examining the Impact of Cloud Radiative Effect on the Development of Tropical Cyclone. Shun-Nan Wu, Univ. of Miami, Miami, FL; B. J. Soden, D. S. Nolan, G. J. Alaka Jr.

17B.6 Evaluation of Tropical Cyclone Activity for OSSE Applications. Paulo D. Paz, Univ. of Miami/CIMAS, Miami, FL; L. Cucurull

18A.7 Wind Gust Distributions of Recent Landfalling Hurricanes. John Kaplan, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; J. A. Zhang, P. P. Peter Dodge, C. J. Slocum

18C.1 Overview and Status of the NASA TROPICS Earth Venture Mission. W. J. Blackwell, MIT Lincoln Laboratory, Lexington, MA; K. Clark, R. V. Leslie, S. A. Braun, R. Bennartz, C. S. Velden, T. Greenwald, D. Herndon, M. DeMaria, G. Chirokova, R. Atlas, J. Dunion, F. Marks, R. F. Rogers, H. Christophersen, B. Annane, B. A. Dahl

18C.3 Tropical Cyclone Intensity Estimation from the TROPICS Smallsat Satellite Constellation. Derrick Herndon, CIMSS/Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI; C. Velden, G. Chirokova, W. J. Blackwell, R. V. Leslie, R. Bennartz, S. Braun, T. Greenwald, M. DeMaria, R. Atlas, F. Marks, R. Rogers, J. Dunion, B. Annane, H. Christophersen, B. A. Dahl

18C.4 TROPICS Radiance Impact on Tropical Cyclone Prediction in an OSSE. Hui Christophersen, Navy Research Laboratory, Monterey, CA; B. A. Dahl, R. Rogers, F. Marks, J. P. Dunion, R. Atlas, W. Blackwell

18C.6 NASA TROPICS Applications and Early Adopter Program. E. Berndt, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL; J. P. Dunion, W. Blackwell, S. Braun, D. S. Green

30 Inner-core Processes Leading to the Rapid Intensification of Early-stage Tropical Cyclones in Moderate Vertical Wind Shear. Xiaomin Chen, NOAA, Miami, FL; J. A. Zhang, F. D. Marks, J. Fang, R. F. Rogers, J. J. Cione

31 The Rapid Intensification and Eyewall Replacement Cycles of Hurricane Irma (2017). Michael S. Fischer, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; R. F. Rogers, P. D. Reasor

50 Initial Evaluation of Dropsonde Hurricane Wind Profiles Modeled with a Neutral Log-Wind Profile. Mark. A. Bourassa, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL; K. Ahern, H. M. Holbach, R. Foster

60 Exploring the Relationship between Temporal Shear Direction Changes and Tropical Cyclone Intensification. Stephanie N. Stevenson, CIRA/NHC, Miami, FL; R. Ríos-Berríos, M. S. Fischer

61 Analyzing Gaps and Hurricane Rain Coverage to Inform NASA Satellite Proposals. Justin P. Stow, Center for Ocean- Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Tallahassee, FL; M. A. Bourassa, H. Holbach, V. Misra

63 Operational SFMR Algorithm Update. Heather M. Holbach, The Florida State Univ., Northern Gulf Institute, and NOAA/AOML/HRD, Tallahassee, FL

64 Reduction of Airborne Tail-Doppler Radar Winds to the Surface. Paul D. Reasor, NOAA/AOML/HRD, Miami, FL; H. M. Holbach, J. F. Gamache

99 The Dynamics of Vortex Rossby Waves and Secondary Eyewall Development in Hurricane Matthew (2016): New Insights from Radar Measurements. Stephen R. Guimond, UMBC/JCET, Baltimore, MD; P. D. Reasor, G. M. Heymsfield, M. McLinden

117 Adaption of the SHARPpy Sounding Analysis Toolkit for Tropical Cyclone Applications. Nicholas E. Johnson, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL; J. Dunion, E. L. Duran, P. Duran, E. Berndt

119 The JPL Tropical Cyclone Information System: Integrating a Wealth of Data for Quickly Advancing the Physical Understanding and Forecasting of Hurricanes. Svetla Hristova-Veleva, JPL/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA; P. P. Li, B. W. Knosp, Q. A. Vu, F. J. Turk, W. L. Poulsen, Z. S. Haddad, B. H. Lambrigtsen, B. W. Stiles, T. P. J. Shen, N. Niamsuwan, S. Tanelli, O. O. Sy, H. Su, D. G. Vane, Y. Chao, P. S. Callahan, R. S. Dunbar, M. T. Montgomery , M. A. Boothe, V. Tallapragada, S. Trahan, A. Wimmers, R. Holz, J. Reid, F. D. Marks Jr. , T. Vukicevic, S. Bhalachandran, H. Leighton, S. Gopalakrishnan, A. Navarro, F. J. Tapiador

Sundararaman Gopalakrishnan co-chaired Session 3C: HURRICANE FORECAST IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (HFIP) AND HURRICANE ANALYSIS AND FORECAST SYSTEM (HAFS) II and Session 4B: HURRICANE FORECAST IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (HFIP) AND HURRICANE ANALYSIS AND FORECAST SYSTEM (HAFS) III

Trey Alvey, Jason Dunion, and Jonathan Zawislak co-chaired Session 5C: TROPICAL CYCLONES AND REMOTE SENSING I and Session 6B: TROPICAL CYCLONES AND REMOTE SENSING II

Lidia Cucurull co-chaired Poster Session 1: HURRICANE FORECAST IMPROVEMENT PROGRAM (HFIP) AND HURRICANE ANALYSIS AND FORECAST SYSTEM (HAFS)

Trey Alvey and Jonathan Zawislak co-chaired Poster Session 2: TROPICAL CYCLONES AND REMOTE SENSING

Jason Dunion, Heather Holbach, and Jonathan Zawislak co-chaired Session 16B: HURRICANE OBSERVATIONS: DATA INTEGRATION, VISUALIZATION, AND MINING and Poster Session 4: HURRICANE OBSERVATIONS: DATA INTEGRATION, VISUALIZATION, AND MINING

Rob Rogers co-chaired Poster Session 4: TROPICAL CYCLONE PRECIPITATION AND ITS PREDICTABILITY and Session 13C: TROPICAL CYCLONE PRECIPITATION AND ITS PREDICTABILITY I

Lisa Bucci and Kelly Ryan co-chaired Session 8A: DATA ASSIMILATION AND OBSERVING STRATEGIES I

Altug Aksoy co-chaired Session 13A: DATA ASSIMILATION AND OBSERVING STRATEGIES II

Gus Alaka co-chaired Session 17A: NUMERICAL MODELING I

Trey Alvey co-chaired the Awards Ceremony and the poster-judging committee overseeing committee members Xiaomin Chen, Jason Dunion, Michael Fischer, Andy Hazelton, Heather Holbach, Josh Wadler, and Jon Zawislak. Michael Fischer served on the committee overseeing the Student Oral Presentation Award and Max Eaton Award. Sim Aberson moderated the AMS Coriolis event for LGBTQ+ and allied attendees.

For more information, contact aoml.communications@noaa.gov.

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