Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 AM P-3 flight into Tropical Storm Erika, 28 August 2015

As Tropical Storm Erika passed south of Puerto Rico and Hispaniola (see the black lines outlining the two islands near the top of of analyses) a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance.

The figure below depicts the aircraft flight track (P-3: yellow line) superposed on a visible satellite imagery.

Screen Shot 2015-08-28I1

Included below you see images of the horizontal winds within 180 km of Erika sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 aircraft during the early morning of 27 August 2015. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler pattern around Erika. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Erika maintained a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation primarily in the eastern semicircle of the storm at all altitudes. There is slight indication of a very broad circulation center at 1- and 3-km altitudes, with the strongest winds 100 km east of the circulation center, and extending to 180 km to the east and northeast of the center onto the south coast of Puerto Rico. At 3-km altitude the strongest winds 150 -180 km east of the circulation center. At 6-km altitude there was still an indication of a circulation center in the heavy precipitation 100-125 km east-southeast of the 1-km altitude circulation center, indicative of very strong west-northwesterly shear of the horizontal wind over the low-level center.

All the Tropical Storm Erika radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/erika2015/radar.html.

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 AM P-3 flight into Tropical Storm Erika, 27 August 2015

As Tropical Storm Erika approached Guadalupe (see the black lines outlining the island in the center left of analyses) a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance. This P-3 mission coincided with the end of the first SHOUT Global Hawk mission into Erika.

The figure below depicts the aircraft flight track (P-3: red line, Global Hawk: blue line) superposed on the real-time lower fuselage radar and infrared satellite imagery.

Screen Shot 2015-08-27I1Included below you see images of the horizontal winds within 180 km of Erika sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 aircraft during the early morning of 27 August 2015. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler pattern around Erika. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Erika maintained a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation primarily in the eastern semicircle of the storm at all altitudes. There is slight indication of a circulation center at 1-km altitude just southeast of Guadalupe, with the strongest winds 70 km northeast of the circulation center, and with strong winds extending to 180 km to the north and east of the center. At 3-km altitude there is slight indication of a circulation center 40-50 km south-southeast of the 1-km altitude circulation center with strong winds over the low-altitude center. At 6-km altitude there was an indication of a circulation center in the heavy precipitation 100-125 km east-southeast of the 1-km altitude circulation center, indicative of very strong west-northwesterly shear of the horizontal wind over the low-level center.

All the Tropical Storm Erika radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/erika2015/radar.html.

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 PM P-3 flight into Tropical Storm Erika, 26 August 2015

As Tropical Storm Erika was 350 km east of the Leeward Islands (see the black lines outlining one of the island in bottom left of analyses) a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance.

The figure below depicts the aircraft flight track (P-3: yellow line) superposed on the real-time lower fuselage radar and visible satellite imagery.

Screen Shot 2015-08-26I2_1Included here you see images of the horizontal winds within 180 km of Erika sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 aircraft during the evening of 26 August 2015. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler pattern around Erika. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Erika maintained a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation primarily in the southeastern quadrant of the storm, particularly at 3- and 6- km altitude. There is indication of a circulation center at 1-and 3-km altitudes, with the strongest winds 50-60 km northeast of the circulation center, but with strong winds extending to 180 km to the north and east of the center. At 6-km altitude there was an indication of a circulation center in the heavy precipitation 125-150 km southeast of the 1-km altitude circulation center, indicative of very strong west-northwesterly shear of the horizontal wind over the low-level center.

All the Tropical Storm Erika radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/erika2015/radar.html.

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 AM P-3 flight into Tropical Storm Erika, 26 August 2015

As Tropical Storm Erika was 600 km east of the Leeward Islands a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance and a Saharan Air Layer Experiment (SALEX) mission.

The figure below depicts the aircraft flight track (P-3: yellow line) superposed on the real-time lower fuselage radar and infrared satellite imagery.

Screen Shot 2015-08-26I1Included here you see images of the horizontal winds within 180 km of Erika sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 aircraft during the early morning of 26 August 2015. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler patterns around Erika. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Erika maintained a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation primarily in the southeastern quadrant of the storm, particularly at 3- and 6- km altitude. There is indication of a circulation center at 1-km altitudes, with the strongest winds 40-50 km northeast of the circulation center, but with strong winds extending to 180 km to the north and east of the center. At 3-km altitude the wind field appeared like a sharp trough oriented southwest-northeast with the strongest winds extending to the north or the 1-km altitude circulation center. At 6-km altitude there was an indication of a circulation center in the heavy precipitation 125-150 km southeast of the 1-km altitude circulation center, indicative of very strong west-northwesterly shear of the horizontal wind over the low-level center.

All the Tropical Storm Erika radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/erika2015/radar.html.

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 PM P-3 and G-IV flights into Tropical Storm Erika, 25 August 2015

As Tropical Storm Erika was 800 km east of the Leeward Islands a NOAA P-3 and G-IV mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance and a Saharan Air Layer Experiment (SALEX) mission.

The figure below depicts the aircraft flight track (P-3: yellow line; G-IV: red line) superposed on the real-time lower fuselage radar and visible satellite imagery.

Screen Shot 2015-08-26 at 10.29.59 AMIncluded here you see images of the horizontal winds within 180 km of Erika sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 and within 350 km of Danny from the G-IV aircraft during the evening of 25 August 2015. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 and G-IV Doppler patterns around Erika. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 and G-IV (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Erika had a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation primarily in the southeastern quadrant of the storm, particularly at 3- and 6- km altitude. There is indication of a very small circulation center at 1- and 3-km altitudes, with strong winds 15-20 km northeast of the circulation center, but with strongest winds extending 100-180 km to the east and northeast of the center. At 6-km altitude there was an indication of a circulation center in the heavy precipitation 125-150 km southeast of the 1-km altitude circulation center, indicative of very strong west-northwesterly shear of the horizontal wind over the low-level center. The G-IV analyses show very strong southerly flow at all altitudes into the circulation from 180-250 km southeast of the low-level center and into the large precipitation area southeast of the center, fueling the deep convection there.

All the Tropical Storm Erika radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/erika2015/radar.html

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 AM P-3 flight into Tropical Storm Danny, 24 August 2015

As Tropical Storm Danny continued to weaken just east of the Leeward Islands (see the black lines outlining the islands) a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance.

The figure below depicts the aircraft flight track (P-3: yellow line) superposed on real-time lower fuselage radar and visible satellite imagery. This was the last mission into Tropical Storm Danny.

Screen Shot 2015-08-24 at 7.16.03 AMIncluded here you see images of the horizontal winds within 180 km of Danny sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 during the early morning of 24 August 2015. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler patterns around Danny. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Danny’s precipitation distribution was more widespread than on the previous missions, but very asymmetric with the bulk of the precipitation covering the northeast and west-southwest quadrants of the storm at all altitudes. There is still an slight indication of a weak circulation center at 1-km altitude, with strongest winds extending from 30-100 km northeast of the circulation center. At 3 and 6-km altitude there is no indication of a circulation center just a shear line extending westward over the 1-km altitude center. The strongest winds at 3-and 6-km altitude were to the northeast of the 1-km circulations center.

All the Hurricane Danny radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/danny2015/radar.html

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 PM P-3 flight into Tropical Storm Danny, 23 August 2015

As Tropical Storm Danny continued to weaken 300 km east of the Leeward Islands a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance.

The figure below depicts the aircraft flight track (P-3: yellow line) superposed on real-time lower fuselage radar and infrared satellite imagery.

Screen Shot 2015-08-23 at 11.24.15 PMIncluded here you see images of the horizontal winds within 180 km of Danny sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 during the evening of 23 August 2015. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler patterns around Danny. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Danny’s precipitation distribution was very spotty and asymmetric, particularly at 6-km altitude, with the bulk of the precipitation covering primarily in the northern semicircle of the storm at 1-km altitude and in the northeastern quadrant of the storm at and 3- and 6-km altitude. There is still an indication of a weak circulation center at 1-km altitude, with strongest winds extending from 30-100 km north-northeast of the circulation center. At 3-km altitude there is an indication of a weak circulation center 80-90 km east of the 1-km circulation center and a shear line extending westward over the 1-km altitude center. The strongest winds at 3-km altitude were to the north of the shear line. At 6-km altitude there was no indication of a circulation center, just a north-south aligned shear line above the circulation enter at 3-km altitude.

All the Hurricane Danny radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/danny2015/radar.html

Hurricane Field Program Update – Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Saturday, 29 August 2015

UAS Global Hawk: Is scheduled to fly over Tropical Storm Erika. It took off around 1100 UTC (7:00AM Eastern) from Wallops Island, VA. It will fly a 24 hour research mission over the storm. This mission is part of NOAA’s Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT) field campaign.

NOAA43 and G-IV: All flights scheduled for today and tomorrow are cancelled.

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For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at: http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site: https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex-hurricane-field-program/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

The Global Hawk flies over Erika collecting data today

The unmanned aircraft, Global Hawk took off early this morning from Wallops Island, VA and is a heading to fly over Erika. It will collect data over the storm for 24 hours. The Global Hawk is part of NOAA’s Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT) field campaign. It will launch dropwindsondes as well as gather data with other meteorological instruments on board. Below is the flight track. The teal squares represent dropwindsonde locations along the yellow flight track line.

GH_Erika