Paper on daily changes in hurricanes released online in Geophysical Research Letters

Summary: The very tall clouds that we see in satellite pictures of tropical cyclones (also known as hurricanes) fan out from the hurricane's center over the course of each day, what we call a diurnal cycle. This is because a pulse of thunderstorms and rain forms near the hurricane center each night and steadily moves … Continue reading Paper on daily changes in hurricanes released online in Geophysical Research Letters

HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

HRD scientists recently attended the 100th American Meteorological Society Meeting in Boston. There, they presented 33 oral presentations and 10 posters. Left to right: Mu-Chich Ko, Andrew Kren, Joe Cione, Karina Apodaca, Michael Mueller, Sarah Ditchek, Steve Diaz, Jonathan Zawislak, Andy Hazelton, Lisa Bucci, Frank Marks, Shirley Murillo, Xuejin Zhang, John Cortinas, Eric Uhlhorn, and … Continue reading HRD at the American Meteorological Society Centennial Meeting

Paper on differences in rainfall between tropical disturbances that form into tropical cyclones and those that don't released online in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: Many weather satellites are outfitted with instruments that can see through clouds to sense where and how hard it is raining (the rain rate), and how much of the rain is occurring in deep convective clouds (cumulus and cumulonimbus clouds that form when warm air rises). They can also see tropical disturbances, which are usually … Continue reading Paper on differences in rainfall between tropical disturbances that form into tropical cyclones and those that don't released online in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on the unusual eyewall replacement cycles in Hurricane Irma released online in Monthly Weather Review

Summary: Accurate forecasts of hurricane strength are necessary to protect people in the path of a storm. The strongest winds in a hurricane are found near the center of the storm, in a ring of dangerous weather called the eyewall. As a hurricane grows older, it is common for the eyewall to eventually weaken and get … Continue reading Paper on the unusual eyewall replacement cycles in Hurricane Irma released online in Monthly Weather Review

Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

Hurricanes are fed by energy from the warm ocean. The center of a hurricane is surrounded by tall clouds, called cumulus clouds, that produce the heat needed to keep the spin, what we call vorticity, in the hurricanes going. When there are a lot of cumulus clouds around the hurricane's center, the hurricane spins more rapidly. However, … Continue reading Paper on the intensification of tropical cyclones in wind shear published in Mausam

HRD Monthly Science Meeting of December 2019

December’s science meeting, hosted by the National Hurricane Center, consisted of seven presentations: Michael Brennan (NHC): “NHC Forecast Verification and Challenges”Mark DeMaria (NHC): “A New Method for Creating a 2-D Surface Wind Field from the NHC Official Forecast”James Franklin (NHC): “HFIP Performance Measure For Rapid Intensification”Mu-Chieh (Laura) Ko (HRD): “A Review of Support Vector Machine … Continue reading HRD Monthly Science Meeting of December 2019

HRD Seminar – Dr. Hyojin Yang, National Institute of Meteorological Sciences (NIMS), Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) – 9 December 2019

Dr. Yang presented a seminar titled "Atmospheric observations for understanding severe weather using KMA/NIMS Atmospheric Research Aircraft during 2018-2019". A recording of the presentation is available on the anonymous ftp site: ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/pub/blog/seminars/2019/Yang_HRD_Seminar_20191209.mp4

Andrew Kren goes to Palm Springs Middle School for the Scientist in Every Florida School program

Why is the past important?   Palm Springs Middle School teacher, Heather Magill shared stories with her students about growing up in Miami during Hurricane Andrew. After the recent Palm Beach County scare and devastating aftermath in the Bahamas from Hurricane Dorian, her students had lots of questions. That’s when Magill reached out to Scientist in Every Florida School. Scientist … Continue reading Andrew Kren goes to Palm Springs Middle School for the Scientist in Every Florida School program