Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 PM P-3 and G-IV flights into Tropical Storm Cristobal, 24 August 2014

As Tropical Storm Cristobal continued to intensify north of the Turks and Caicos Islands (the island coast line is visible as black line in the lower left of the G-IV images) a NOAA P-3 and G-IV mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance.  Included here you see images of the horizontal winds within 300 km of Cristobal sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 and within 450 km of Cristobal from the G-IV aircraft during the afternoon of 24 August 2014. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 and G-IV Doppler patterns around Cristobal. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 and G-IV (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that Cristobal still had a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation surrounding the center and extending primarily in the eastern semi-circle of the storm. There is indication of a circulation center at all altitudes, with stronger winds 90-100 km east-southeast of the circulation center at 1-km altitude, and extending to 190-210 km to the east-northeast of the center at 3-6 km altitude (particularly evident in the G-IV analyses). From 1-6 km altitude the circulation center is tilted 20-25 km toward the east-southeast indicative of weakening westerly shear of the horizontal wind since the last mission.

All the Tropical Storm Cristobal radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/cristobal2014/radar.html

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 AM P-3 flight into Tropical Depression 4, 24 August 2014

As Tropical Depression 4 (TD04, soon to become Tropical Storm Cristobal) continued to intensify north of the Turks and Caicos Islands (the island coast line is visible as black line in the lower left of the images) a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance.  Included here you see images of the horizontal winds within 300 km of TD04 sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 during the early morning of 24 August 2014. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler pattern around TD04. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that TD04 still had a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation surrounding the center and extending primarily in the eastern semi-circle of the storm. There is indication of a circulation center at all altitudes, with stronger winds 90-100 km east-southeast of the circulation center at 1-km altitude, and extending to 200-225 km to the east-northeast of the center at 3-6 km altitude. From 1-6 km altitude the circulation center is tilted 50-60 km toward the east indicative of strong westerly shear of the horizontal wind.

All the TD04/Cristobal radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/cristobal2014/radar.html

Doppler radar quick-looks from 2:00 PM P-3 flight into Tropical Depression 4, 23 August 2014

As Tropical Depression 4 (TD04, soon to become Tropical Storm Cristobal) formed in the vicinity of the Turks and Caicos Islands (the island coast line is visible as black line in the lower left of the images) a NOAA P-3 mission collected airborne Doppler radar data to use in initializing and evaluating model guidance.  Included here you see images of the horizontal winds within 300 km of TD04 sampled from the tail Doppler radar on the P-3 during the evening of 23 August 2014. These images are at three altitudes (1 km, 3 km, and 6 km) and are a composite of winds from the P-3 Doppler pattern around TD04. Also plotted on each analysis are the locations of dropsondes deployed by the P-3 (plotted using standard station symbols). These analyses show that TD04 had a very asymmetric distribution of precipitation at all altitudes, with the bulk of the precipitation surrounding the center and extending primarily toward the south and east. There is indication of a circulation center at all altitudes, with stronger winds 45-50 km east of the circulation center at 1-km altitude, and a secondary wind maximum 130-150 km in the eastern semi-circle surrounding the center at 1- and 3-km altitude. From 1-6 km altitude the circulation center is tilted 40-50 km toward the east-southeast indicative of westerly shear of the horizontal wind.

All the TD04/Cristobal radar composites at 0.5-km height resolution are available at http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/cristobal2014/radar.html

NOAA’s P3 is set to take off for another flight into Cristobal

NOAA43 will fly this afternoon into Cristobal. Take off is scheduled for 2PM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Below is the proposed flight track. The dots on the flight track (shown in green) represent the aircraft turn points. The red dots in the figure show the locations that launch weather balloons twice a day while the purple dots are the locations that launch balloons once a day.

 

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Hurricane Field Program Update – Tuesday, August 26, 2014 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

NOAA42:  Is tasked to fly a Tail Doppler Radar mission into Hurricane Cristobal. Take off was around 2AM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Three HRD scientists were onboard.

G-IV: Was tasked to fly a Tail Doppler Radar research mission around Hurricane Cristobal. The G-IV is not available therefore this flight is cancelled.

NOAA43:  Is tasked to fly a Tail Doppler Radar mission into Hurricane Cristobal. Take off is scheduled for 2PM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Three HRD scientists will be onboard.

…………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
http://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

Its an early morning flight into Cristobal for NOAA’s P3 hurricane hunter aircraft

NOAA’s P3 aircraft -NOAA42, is starting their day with an early morning flight into Cristobal. The flight will take off at 2AM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Below is the proposed flight track. The dots on the flight track (shown in green) represent the aircraft turn points. The red dots in the figure show the locations that launch weather balloons twice a day while the purple dots are the locations that launch balloons once a day.

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NOAA’s P3 continues to sample Tropical Storm Cristobal

The NOAA43 P3 aircraft is on its way to fly into Tropical Storm Cristobal. Below is the proposed flight track. The flight duration is about eight hours. The dots on the flight track (shown in green) represent the aircraft turn points. The red dots in the figure show the locations that launch weather balloons twice a day while the purple dots are the locations that launch balloons once a day.

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Engines on, as the G-IV jet gets ready to fly around Cristobal

NOAA’s G-IV hurricane hunter jet is about to take off from MacDill Air Force Base to fly around Tropical Storm Cristobal. The proposed flight track is shown below. The goal of this flight is to capture as much data as they can using the tail Doppler radar onboard. The dots on the flight track (shown in green) represent the aircraft turn points. The red dots in the figure show the locations that launch weather balloons twice a day while the purple dots are the locations that launch balloons once a day.

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Hurricane Field Program Update – Monday, August 25, 2014 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Monday, August 25, 2014

NOAA42:  Is tasked to fly a Tail Doppler Radar mission into Tropical Storm Cristobal. Take off was around 2AM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Three HRD scientists are onboard.

G-IV: Will fly a Tail Doppler Radar research mission around Tropical Storm Cristobal. Take off is scheduled for 1:30PM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. No HRD scientists will be onboard.

NOAA43:  Is tasked to fly a Tail Doppler Radar mission into Tropical Storm Cristobal. Take off is scheduled for 2PM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Three HRD scientists will be onboard.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

NOAA42:  Is tasked to fly a Tail Doppler Radar mission into Tropical Storm Cristobal. Take off is scheduled for 2AM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Three HRD scientists will be onboard.

G-IV: Has been put on alert to fly a Tail Doppler Radar research mission around Tropical Storm Cristobal. If this mission is a go the jet will take off is scheduled for 1:30PM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. No HRD scientists will be onboard.

NOAA43:  Is tasked to fly a Tail Doppler Radar mission into Tropical Storm Cristobal. Take off is scheduled for 2PM Eastern from MacDill Air Force Base. Three HRD scientists will be onboard.

…………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
http://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

NOAA42 P3 aircraft is taking off to fly into Tropical Storm Cristobal

NOAA’s Hurricane Hunter P3 aircraft is ready to take off to fly into Tropical Storm Cristobal this morning. Take off time is scheduled for 2AM Eastern out of MacDill Air Force Base. Below is the proposed flight track. The dots on the flight track (shown in green) represent the aircraft turn points. The red dots in the figure show the locations that launch weather balloons twice a day while the purple dots are the locations that launch balloons once a day.

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