NOAA’s G-IV jet set to fly around mid-Atlantic disturbance (AL93)

NOAA’s G-IV jet is scheduled to fly around the tropical disturbance that is located in the mid-Atlantic (AL93). The jet will collect data in he environment northwest and around AL93. The flight will take off at 1:30 PM Eastern. Below is the flight track. The numbers on the figure represent the launch locations of the GPS dropwindsondes. The data collected on this flight will help us understand the atmospheric conditions that AL93 may experience in the coming days.

2014080100_AL932014_N49track

 

Hurricane Field Program Update – Thursday, July 31, 2014 9:10AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Thursday, July 31, 2014

G-IV: Is tasked to fly a surveillance mission around the area of disturbed weather in the mid Atlantic (AL93).  Take off is planned for 130PM Eastern from Barbados. No HRD scientists will be on this flight.

…………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
http://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

Hurricane Field Program Update – Wednesday, July 30, 2014 10:45AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

All flight P-3 missions to collect data for the area of disturbed weather in the mid-Atlantic (AL93) have been cancelled.

G-IV: Is ferrying down to Barbados from MacDill Air Force Base. No HRD scientists will be on this flight.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

G-IV: Is tasked to fly a surveillance mission around the area of disturbed weather in the mid Atlantic (AL93).  No HRD scientists will be on this flight.

…………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
http://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

Hurricane Field Program Update – Tuesday, July 29, 2014 10:25PM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

NOAA42:  Will take off from MacDill Air Force Base at noon (eastern) to ferry to St. Croix. Two HRD scientists will be onboard.

G-IV: Will also ferry down to St. Croix tomorrow from MacDill Air Force Base. No HRD scientists will be on this flight.

NOAA43: Will take off at 11AM (eastern) and ferry to Barbados. Two HRD scientists will be on this flight.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

G-IV: Is tasked to fly a surveillance mission around the area of disturbance in the mid Atlantic (AL93).  No HRD scientists will be on this flight.

NOAA42:  Is tasked to fly a Pre-storm ocean survey research mission. The goal of this mission is to gather oceanic and atmospheric data in the area ahead of AL93. The NOAA42 aircraft is scheduled to take off at 10AM (eastern) from St. Croix and recover in Barbados eight hours later. Two HRD scientists will be onboard.

…………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at

http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
http://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

45th Anniversary of Super Typhoon Viola

Viola1969

Nimbus satellite picture of Super Typhoon Viola near its peak intensity

On July 26, 1969, Super Typhoon Viola reached its peak intensity with 145 mph winds as it passed north of Luzon in the Philippines.  It weakened as it moved south of Taiwan and was a minimal typhoon with 80 mph winds when it struck Guangdong province on mainland China early July 28th.  Despite its minimal status, nearly 1000 people drowned in floods caused by the very heavy rainfall brought by Viola.

405th Anniversary of the Sea Venture’s hurricane encounter

Coat_of_arms_of_Bermuda.svg

Bermuda’s Coat of Arms and Motto

On July 24, 1609 the English ship Sea Venture encountered a hurricane while en route to resupply the Jamestown colony in Virginia.  The ship had recently been constructed for the specific purpose of carrying colonists and supplies, but it was launched before its caulking had properly set.  Running into the violent storm the Sea Venture became separated from the rest of the resupply fleet and began leaking profusely.  By chance, the next day the ship came upon an archipelago in the midst of the ocean.  Sir George Somers deliberately grounded his vessel on the reef surrounding the islands to prevent it sinking.  150 people and a dog were landed on the main island by the Venture‘s longboat.

Many survived for nearly a year as the Venture was scavenged for material to construct two new ships, the Patience and the Deliverance.  The two ships sailed from what they dubbed “Somers Isles” for Jamestown in May of 1610.  Eventually, accounts of their miraculous survival reached England.  These publications inspired William Shakespeare in his writing the play “The Tempest” in which Prospero conjures up a storm to drive his rival’s ship to his island exile.

Somers Isles remained the property of the London Company (and its successor the Somers Isles Company) until it was taken over by the British crown in 1684.  Eventually, the islands were renamed the Bermuda Islands in honor of Juan de Bermudez, who had first discovered them a century before the Sea Venture found refuge there.  The coat of arms of Bermuda bears an image of the Sea Venture foundering upon the reef and its motto “Quo Fata Ferunt” is Latin for “Whither the Fates Carry [Us]“.

 

HRD Scientists brief NOAA Aircraft Operations Center personnel on IFEX 2014, MacDill AFB, FL – 10 July 2014

Intensity Forecast Experiment (IFEX) Field Program Director Paul Reasor and HRD Director Frank Marks briefed the Aircraft Operations Center (AOC) personnel on IFEX plans for 2014 and HFIP progress. The presentations are available in a .zip archive on the anonymous ftp site at:

ftp://ftp.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/pub/blog/seminars/2014/AOC_IFEX_brief_20140710.zip