Hurricane Field Program Update – Saturday, September 20, 2014 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Saturday, September 20, 2014

NOAA43: Will ferry back to MacDill Air Force Base from St. Croix. Take off time is scheduled for noon.

 …………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex-hurricane-field-program/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

 

 

New technologies successfully deployed in recent hurricane flights

cione_coyote

Dr. Joe Cione of AOML’s Hurricane Research Division displays the Coyote UAS (Credit NOAA/AOML)

During NOAA’s recent reconnaissance and surveillance missions into Hurricane Edouard, aircraft-deployed unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) were successfully deployed for the first time. On September 16, 2014, Sensintel’s Coyote UAS was released into major Hurricane Edouard’s eye using NOAA’s P-3 aircraft operating out of Bermuda as the delivery vehicle. Once deployed, the 7-lb, 5-ft-wingspan Coyote proceeded to spiral downward and outward into the high-wind hurricane eyewall. At an altitude of approximately 3000 ft, it penetrated Edouard’s western eyewall and then proceeded to orbit into the southwestern portion of the eyewall before briefly re-entering the eye during its 28-minute mission. Data from this demonstration (pressure, temperature, humidity, wind velocity and many aircraft-derived metrics) are currently being analyzed and evaluated. Preliminary investigations already suggest a highly unique dataset.

coyote ready_launch

The Coyote being readied for launch. (Credit: NOAA/AOML)

The next day, still operating out of Bermuda, the team was able to successfully conduct a second Coyote mission into Hurricane Edouard. This time, the experiment was designed was to send the Coyote along a low-level inflow channel similar to what air might experience as it spirals towards the eye. This second flight set endurance records for the Coyote, remaining airborne for 68 minutes at a controlled altitude of 1000-2500 ft.  The Coyote may also have directly measured the sea-surface temperature as it expired into the ocean.  This is the first such dataset of its kind. “Data from these new and promising technologies have yet to be analyzed but are expected to provide unique and potentially groundbreaking insights into a critical region of the storm environment that is typically difficult to observe in sufficient detail,” said Joe Cione, a NOAA Hurricane Researcher and Principal Investigator for the Coyote project.  In all, four Coyotes were deployed in Edouard.

In addition, a new technology that builds on the proven success of the GPS dropwindsonde was also tested for the first time this hurricane season, thanks to support from the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 (the Sandy Supplemental) and stellar engineering work by NOAA’s Aircraft Operations Center and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. Several modified dropwindsondes that incorporate an infrared sensor allowed for the first-ever estimates of co-located air-sea thermodynamic measurements within a hurricane. These special instruments (called IR sondes) also included an experimental, large parachute design which allows for higher-resolution vertical sampling r than was previously available.

coyote_flight_pattern

Joe Cione and members of the Coyote team monitor the data from the piloting station on the P3. (Credit: NOAA/AOML)

Data from these new and promising technologies (both IR sondes and Coyote) will be analyzed and are expected to provide unique and potentially groundbreaking insights into a critical region of the storm environment that is typically difficult to observe.

coyote_hand_shake

RDML Anita Lopez (NOAA Corps) meets Bermuda Premier Michael Dunkley. (Credit: NOAA)

The Government of Bermuda hosted these missions and effectively served as international partners in NOAA’s effort to improve hurricane forecasts for all countries affected by these storms.  NOAA looks forward to continued research into the application of air-deployed unmanned aircraft to support and improve hurricane research and forecasts.

Hurricane Field Program Update – Friday, September 19, 2014 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Friday, September 19, 2014

NOAA42: Will ferry back to MacDill Air Force Base from the Bermuda. Take off time is scheduled for noon. One HRD scientists will be on this flight.

NOAA43: Is tasked to fly a Ocean Glider research flight. They took off from St. Croix around 10AM. The goal of this mission is to fly over the ocean glider that is deployed just north of Puerto Rico. One HRD scientist will be on board.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

NOAA43: Will ferry back to MacDill Air Force Base from St. Croix. Take off time is scheduled for noon.

 …………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex-hurricane-field-program/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

 

 

Hurricane Field Program Update – Thursday, September 18, 2014 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Thursday, September 18, 2014

G-IV: Will ferry back to MacDill Air Force Base from Bermuda.

Friday, September 19, 2014

NOAA42: Will ferry back to MacDill Air Force Base from the island of Bermuda. Take off time is scheduled for noon. One HRD scientists may be on this flight.

NOAA43: Is tasked to fly a Ocean Glider research flight. Take off time from St. Croix is TBD. The goal of this mission is to fly over the ocean glider that is deployed just north of Puerto Rico. One HRD scientist will be on board.

 …………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex-hurricane-field-program/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

 

The eye of Edouard

Kristie Twining's photo of Edouard's eye

Kristie Twining’s photo of the eye of Edouard

 

Yesterday, NOAA 42 was flying into Hurricane Edouard while it was a Category 3 hurricane and was orbiting in its eye for an hour while monitoring a UAV they had launched in the storm’s center.  A number of crew members took the opportunity to photograph the spectacular ‘stadium effect’ eyewall.  We have collected some of these on our photo page for Edouard.  For those of you curious as to what it is like to fly into a hurricane, here’s an idea about what the scenery is like.

 

http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/Storm_pages/edouard2014/photo.html

Hurricane Field Program Update – Wednesday, September 17, 2014 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

NOAA42: Is tasked to fly a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Experiment with the COYOTE UAS. They took off around 8AM from Bermuda. Two HRD scientists will be on this flight.

NOAA43: Is tasked to fly a a post-storm Ocean Survey Experiment. Take off time from St. Croix is set for 1:30PM. One HRD scientist will be on board.

G-IV: Is tasked to fly a around Edouard. They are taking off around 11AM from Bermuda.

 …………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex-hurricane-field-program/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

 

NOAA Hurricane Hunter aircraft are on their way to fly in Hurricane Edouard

The NOAA42 P3 and NOAA49 jet took off early this morning to fly into Hurricane Edouard. NOAA42 is flying an experiment called the  Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Experiment. The P3 will launch an unmanned aerial system called the Coyote. The Coyote drone is expected to fly for a few hours near the sea surface and collect meteorological data. NOAA49 jet flying a star pattern sampling the upper atmospheric environment of Edouard. NOAA 43 will take off from St. Croix later today to fly a post-storm Ocean survey mission. The goal of this flight is to collect oceanic data in the area where the storm has passed and record the changes of the sea state. Below are the proposed flight tracks for NOAA42 and NOAA49. The dots on the flight track (shown in green) represent the aircraft turn points. The red dots in the figure show the locations that launch weather balloons twice a day while the purple dots are the locations that launch balloons once a day.

NOAA42 proposed flight track

NOAA42 proposed flight track

NOAA49 proposed flight track

NOAA49 proposed flight track

 

Hurricane Field Program Update – Tuesday, September 16, 2014 11AM Eastern

OPERATIONS

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

NOAA42: Is tasked to fly a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Experiment with the COYOTE UAS. They took off from Bermuda around 9:30AM. Two HRD scientists are on this flight.

NOAA43: Is tasked to fly a NESDIS Ocean Winds Experiment. Take of time from St. Croix is scheduled for 11AM. Two HRD scientists will be on board.

G-IV: Was tasked to fly a Model Evaluation Experiment. This flight is cancelled. The jet is not available at this time.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

NOAA42: Is tasked to fly a Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Experiment with the COYOTE UAS. Take off time from Bermuda is set for 8AM. Two HRD scientists will be on this flight.

NOAA43: Is tasked to fly a a post-storm Ocean Survey Experiment. Take off time from St. Croix is TBD. Three HRD scientists will be on board.

G-IV: Is tasked to fly a around Edouard. Take off time from Bermuda is scheduled for 8AM Eastern.

 …………………………………………………………………….

For the latest information about tropical cyclones and other weather systems, please visit the NOAA/NWS/National Hurricane Center web site at
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov

To access updates on IFEX and other HRD activities via Facebook, Twitter, or RSS feed, check out the HRD home page at
http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd

To directly access updates on IFEX HFP Operations via our WordPress blog on the web, check the site
https://noaahrd.wordpress.com/category/ifex-hurricane-field-program/

DISCLAIMER: The above discussion is intended to provide a brief summary of recent and future HRD Hurricane Field Program Operations. Any use of this material beyond its original intent is prohibited without permission of the HRD Director. Media inquiries should be directed to Erica Rule (305-361-4541) or Erica.Rule@noaa.gov, Evan Forde (305-361-4327) or Evan.Forde@noaa.gov, Monica Allen (301-734-1123) or Monica.Allen@noaa.gov.

 

NOAA continues to gather data in Hurricane Edouard

NOAA’s Hurricane Hunter P3 aircraft – NOAA42 and NOAA43 will fly again today into Hurricane Edouard. NOAA42 will take off from Bermuda around 9:30AM. They are flying an experiment called the  Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Experiment. The P3 will launch unmanned aerial systems called the Coyote. The Coyote drone is expected to fly close to the sea surface and collect meteorological data. NOAA 43 will take off from St. Croix at 11AM. It will fly an Ocean Winds Experiment. The goal of this experiment is to collect data coincident with polar satellite overpasses. Below is the proposed flight track for NOAA42. The dots on the flight track (shown in green) represent the aircraft turn points. The red dots in the figure show the locations that launch weather balloons twice a day while the purple dots are the locations that launch balloons once a day. 

NOAA42 proposed flight track

NOAA42 proposed flight track